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JPSS-1

 

NOAA’s JPSS-1 Satellite Arrives in California for Launch

September 5, 2017

Before JPSS-1 launches into space this November, it had to travel from Colorado to California. To see how it got there, check out our new photo essay!

 

Before JPSS-1 launches into space this November, it had to travel from Colorado to California. To see how it got there, check out our new photo essay!

 

NOAA's Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) satellite arrived at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Sept. 1, 2017, to begin preparations for a November launch.

After its arrival, the JPSS-1 spacecraft was pulled from its shipping container, and is being prepared for encapsulation on top of the rocket that will take it to its polar orbit at an altitude of 512 miles (824 km) above Earth.

JPSS-1 is scheduled to be launched aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket from Space Launch Complex-2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Nov. 10, 2017, at 1:47 a.m., PST.

JPSS-1, which will be known as NOAA-20 after it reaches orbit, has a seven-year design life. NOAA partnered with NASA to implement the JPSS series of U.S. civilian polar-orbiting environmental remote sensing satellites and sensors. JPSS-1 is the first in a series of NOAA’s four next-generation, polar-orbiting weather satellites.

Launched in 2011, the joint NOAA/NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP), is a bridge between NASA's Earth Observing System of satellites and JPSS. Suomi NPP has been operating as NOAA’s primary operational satellite for global weather observations since May 2014.

JPSS-1 will orbit in the same plane as Suomi NPP, with JPSS-1 operating about 50 minutes ahead of Suomi NPP, allowing important overlap in observational coverage. It takes about 14 passes for each satellite in this orbit to cover Earth's surface. 

The sensor capabilities for JPSS-1 have similar capabilities to those on Suomi NPP: the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS), built by Northrop Grumman; theCross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), built by Harris; the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite-Nadir (OMPS-N), built by Ball Aerospace;  the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), built by Northrop Grumman; and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), built by Raytheon.

JPSS fulfills NOAA’s requirements to collect global multi-spectral radiometry and other specialized meteorological and oceanographic data, by remote sensing of land, sea and the atmosphere. These data support NOAA’s abilities to continuously observe Earth’s environment to better understand and predict changes in weather, climate, oceans and coasts, which supports the Nation’s economy and protect lives and property.

For more information, please visit www.jpss.noaa.gov

 


JPSS-1 Has New Target Launch Date

September 1, 2017

JPSS-1 Spacecraft Photo
Credit: Ball Aerospace

The launch of JPSS-1, the first in a series of NOAA’s four next-generation operational polar-orbiting weather satellites that will give scientists the most advanced tools to aid in weather forecasting and earth observations, is scheduled for November 10 at 1:47 a.m. PST from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. 

“Hurricane Harvey is a stark reminder of the importance of the NOAA satellite program,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families affected by this disaster.”

These advanced Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) satellites will serve as the backbone of NOAA’s weather forecasting system for the next 20 years, providing the reliable, global observations required to support accurate numerical weather forecasts up to seven days in advance.

The new launch date has given engineers extra time to complete testing of the spacecraft and instrument electronics and to finish work on the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder, one of the primary instruments on JPSS. The satellite carries five state-of-the-art instruments providing a comprehensive suite of earth observations. 

“The JPSS-1 team has done an incredible job getting this extremely capable satellite prepared for launch and ready to send back quality environmental data soon after it is in orbit,” said Stephen Volz, Ph.D., director, NOAA’s Satellite and Information Service.

The satellite is scheduled to arrive in California just before the Labor Day weekend, where it will undergo final preparation before it is launched aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket. When it reaches orbit, JPSS-1 will be renamed NOAA-20.

Following launch, JPSS-1 will join Suomi NPP, the joint NOAA-NASA weather satellite giving the United States two, highly sophisticated satellites, each circling the Earth 14 times per day, providing full, global observations for U.S. weather prediction. Suomi NPP, which initially was planned as a research and risk reduction mission when it launched on October 28, 2011, became NOAA’s primary operational satellite for global weather observations on May 1, 2014.

Ball Aerospace designed and built the JPSS-1 satellite bus and Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite instrument, integrated all five of the spacecraft’s instruments and performed satellite-level testing and launch support. Raytheon Corporation built the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite and built the common ground system. Harris Corporation built the Cross-track Infrared Sounder. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems built the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System instrument.

NOAA works in partnership with NASA on all JPSS missions, ensuring a continuous series of global weather data to secure a more "Weather-Ready” Nation.


Suomi NPP Sees Iceberg Larger than London

July 18, 2017

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite captured these Day-Night Band (top) and I-05 longwave infrared band (below) images of the Larsen C ice shelf, which calved an immense iceberg sometime between July 10 and the morning of July 12, 2017.

Scientists from Project Midas, a UK-based Antarctic research project, estimate that the iceberg is approximately 2,240 square miles (5,800 square kilometers) -- more than three times the size of the greater London-area -- weighs more than 1-trillion tons and has a volume that is twice that of Lake Erie.

For more information, see our article, "Larsen C Ice Shelf Calves Large Iceberg.


#JPSS1 Social Takes Boulder by Storm

June 19, 2017

Photo of the NOAA and NASA Social Gurus Event Participants


Three months ahead of launch, NOAA and NASA hosted an event for social media gurus to showcase the JPSS-1 spacecraft and instrumentation. Twenty-five writers, bloggers, videographers, teachers, artists and meteorologists attended the JPSS NASA social on June 19, 2017 in Boulder, Colorado.

The day started with a tour of the NOAA facilities including the Space Weather Prediction Center and the National Weather Service for the Denver area, presentations by the Ozone and Water Vapor Group and   the National Centers for Environmental Information and demonstrations of JPSS data on the original Science on A Sphere display. After lunch, participants were given in-depth presentations on the JPSS-1 mission by the Program Director, Gregory Mandt, and the JPSS-1 Program Manager from Ball Aerospace, Alex Chernushin, and were able to interact with technical and scientific mission experts.
 

Photo of the NOAA and NASA Social Gurus Event Participants


Social media participants posted about JPSS before, during and after the event using the hashtag designation #jpss1. Reviews and post-event coverage, from several points of view, include the following articles, podcasts and videos:


We thank all of the participants, speakers, and experts for a successful and exciting day.


JPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction Teams Bridges the Gap between Data and Users

June 16, 2017

Smoke from the Fort McMurray Fire

Smoke from the Fort McMurray fire was swept up into a cyclonic spin over northern Canada.

The process of transforming raw satellite data into useful products is complex and continuously under improvement. Leading this effort for NOAA's Joint Polar Satellite Service (JPSS), is the JPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction (PGRR) team -- a group comprised of JPSS scientists and engineers, as well as representatives from user communities, such as the National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Forecasting Offices and the National Ocean Services.

Each year, PGRR team members come together to hear from the scientists developing the latest Suomi NPP and JPSS data sets, algorithms and products, and get feedback from users. This year, the PGRR team held its 2017 PGRR Project Review in late May at the University of Maryland. The multi-day event included presentations from scientists working in the focus areas of  hydrology, river ice and flooding, the arctic, oceans and coasts, fires and smoke; evaluations from end-users; and application-oriented focus groups that developed methodologies for implementing agreed-upon changes.

Based on the content of this year's review, it was clear that the PGRR program developed several successful products to help NWS and other users to leverage the capabilities of the instruments on board JPSS satellites and the data they produce to support key areas including weather, fires and flooding. Among them are:

Keeping Tabs on Alaska's Icy Rivers

River ice is a significant threat in Alaska where ice can dam and flood a river quickly. PGRR products are used to track ice and flooding conditions in this area and proved valuable in helping residents respond to a flooding event on the Yukon River in May 2013 and have been in use during Alaskan Spring ice break-up ever since.

Tracking Wildfire Smoke in the Atmosphere

The Fire and Smoke Initiative described how JPSS scientists were able to build on their success evaluating products during the Fort McMurray fire in Alberta, Canada in May 2016. VIIRS Day/Night Band imagery showed the fire's progression on consecutive nights and the team used its visualization products to show how smoke from the fire moved in the atmosphere.

Monitoring Marine Health with Sea Surface Temperature

The National Ocean Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service used Ocean and coastal products from JPSS pertaining to  ocean color, nighttime maps, and sea surface temperature, which is a critical measurement for coral reefs, in long and short-term efforts to conserve marine ecosystems.

To learn more about the JPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction (PGRR) team and it's continuous efforts to improve JPSS satellite data and products, visit the JPSS website.


Meet JPSS

May 17, 2017

 

As they orbit around the planet from pole to pole 14 times per day, the satellites of the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) will keeping an eye on the weather and taking constant measurements of Earth's atmosphere, land and oceans, collecting data used in weather forecasts and other essential products and services!

Before the first of the new JPSS satellite series rockets into space later this year, take a moment to get acquainted!


VIIRS Storms and Fires Images

May 10, 2017

The VIIRS images show massive storms and fires across several southern states.

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) will be one of the key science instruments on JPSS-1. The instrument was experimentally tested on the currently operational NOAA/NASA Suomi-NPP satellite and provides useful and important environmental monitoring. For instance, did you know the Southeast U.S. has been facing extreme weather elements this week?

The images above show massive storms and fires across several southern states. Storms brought devastating winds to Texas and Louisiana, resulting in power outages and even some ensuing tornadoes. Fires in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in Georgia have burned more than 130,000 acres and more than 500 people have been evacuated from their homes. VIIRS images are used to monitor and measure dangers weather phenomenon to help protect the public and local economies.


The Road to Launch

April 21, 2017

A picture of the JPSS-1 spacecraft was moved to a customized metal structure that goes into the thermal vacuum chamber prior to the spacecraft.

Welcome to the JPSS-1 “road to launch” page, and happy (almost) Earth Day! No satellites will do more to give us a full picture of our Earth than the satellites of the JPSS series, which provide vivid images and critical data on global environmental conditions twice daily.

This page is your first stop for the latest news and information about the road to launch for JPSS-1 and the JPSS series mission.

Using the tabs on the left you can also learn about the goals of the mission and the spacecraft, including the instruments aboard and the launch vehicle that will send JPSS-1 to space. Want more detail? We’ll provide helpful links to materials on the JPSS program site to get you to the right place.

Together with NASA, and our many corporate partners, we welcome you to follow along with JPSS-1 on its spectacular journey to space. Go Polar!


CubeSats Fly with JPSS-1

March 28, 2017

Did you know that there will be CubeSats launched alongside NOAA’s JPSS-1 later this year? The CubeSats are part of the Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) program which is part of NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative.

Read more here.


NOAA’s JPSS-1 Satellite Begins Environmental Testing

April 27, 2016

NOAA’s JPSS-1 satellite, the second in the JPSS series of satellites, slated to launch in 2017, is currently going through environmental testing. Environmental testing simulates the harsh environments the satellite may experience during launch and once in orbit. The JPSS-1 satellite and its instruments will undergo a variety of rigorous tests during the environmental testing period, which include subjecting it to acoustics, vibration, electromagnetic, thermal vacuum conditions and compatibility testing with the ground system.

Read More here.


All Instruments Now Integrated with Spacecraft

February 11, 2016

The final instrument to be integrated with NOAA’s Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) satellite is now complete, moving the spacecraft development towards launch as planned in early 2017. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) instrument is the fifth and final instrument to be integrated with the JPSS-1 spacecraft. It follows the successful integration of the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite-Nadir (OMPS-N), the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instruments.

Read more here


Solar Array Successfully Completes Deployment Testing

September 30, 2015

The solar panel array on NOAA's polar-orbiting satellite JPSS-1 spacecraft successfully completed deployment testing at Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in a cleanroom facility near where the JPSS-1 satellite is undergoing integration and test.

Read more here.


Cross-track Infrared Sounder Instrument Now Integrated on Spacecraft

April 9, 2015

The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), which will fly aboard NOAA’s Joint Polar Satellite System-1 satellite, has been successfully integrated with the spacecraft. CrIS is the fourth instrument to be integrated on the JPSS-1 spacecraft.

Read more here.


NOAA’s JPSS-1 Satellite Imaging Instrument Successfully Integrated on Spacecraft

March 10, 2015

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) has been successfully integrated onboard NOAA’s Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) satellite. The VIIRS instrument, built by the Raytheon Company in El Segundo, California, is the third instrument to be integrated on the spacecraft by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in Boulder, Colorado.

Read more here.


Second JPSS-1 Instrument Integrated with Satellite

January 23, 2015

The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite-Nadir (OMPS-N) instrument has been successfully integrated with the JPSS-1 spacecraft, NOAA announced today. OMPS is the second JPSS-1 instrument to be integrated after the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) was installed last month. OMPS-N was built by Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado where the integration also took place. JPSS-1 is the next polar-orbiting NOAA satellite in the JPSS constellation and is scheduled to be launched in 2017.

Read more here.


First JPSS-1 Instrument Integrated with Satellite

December 17, 2014

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument that will fly on the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 spacecraft (JPSS-1), NOAA's next polar orbiting environmental satellite, has been successfully integrated with the spacecraft. CERES is the first JPSS-1 instrument to be integrated, marking the start of a new phase in the completion of the satellites’ development. CERES was built by Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems in Redondo Beach, California and was shipped to Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in Boulder, Colorado for integration.

Read more here.


First JPSS-1 Satellite Instrument is Ready for Installation

April 24, 2014

The first of five instruments that will fly on JPSS-1, NOAA's next polar orbiting environmental satellite, successfully completed pre-shipment review last week. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) measures reflected sunlight and thermal radiation emitted by the Earth and builds on the highly successful legacy instruments flown on NOAA's previous Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) and NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) missions.

Read more here.


JPSS-1 Spacecraft Completes Delta Critical Design Review

January 15, 2013

A four-day delta Critical Design Review (dCDR) of work conducted by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., of Boulder, Colo., was held in December 2012 with representatives from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.; NASA Headquarters, Washington; the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington; and JPSS instrument providers.  

Read more here.