NOAA -- The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

JPSS-1

 

Meet JPSS

May 17, 2017

 

As they orbit around the planet from pole to pole 14 times per day, the satellites of the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) will keeping an eye on the weather and taking constant measurements of Earth's atmosphere, land and oceans, collecting data used in weather forecasts and other essential products and services!

Before the first of the new JPSS satellite series rockets into space later this year, take a moment to get acquainted!


VIIRS Storms and Fires Images

May 10, 2017

The VIIRS images show massive storms and fires across several southern states.

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) will be one of the key science instruments on JPSS-1. The instrument was experimentally tested on the currently operational NOAA/NASA Suomi-NPP satellite and provides useful and important environmental monitoring. For instance, did you know the Southeast U.S. has been facing extreme weather elements this week?

The images above show massive storms and fires across several southern states. Storms brought devastating winds to Texas and Louisiana, resulting in power outages and even some ensuing tornadoes. Fires in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in Georgia have burned more than 130,000 acres and more than 500 people have been evacuated from their homes. VIIRS images are used to monitor and measure dangers weather phenomenon to help protect the public and local economies.


The Road to Launch

April 21, 2017

A picture of the JPSS-1 spacecraft was moved to a customized metal structure that goes into the thermal vacuum chamber prior to the spacecraft.

Welcome to the JPSS-1 “road to launch” page, and happy (almost) Earth Day! No satellites will do more to give us a full picture of our Earth than the satellites of the JPSS series, which provide vivid images and critical data on global environmental conditions twice daily.

This page is your first stop for the latest news and information about the road to launch for JPSS-1 and the JPSS series mission.

Using the tabs on the left you can also learn about the goals of the mission and the spacecraft, including the instruments aboard and the launch vehicle that will send JPSS-1 to space. Want more detail? We’ll provide helpful links to materials on the JPSS program site to get you to the right place.

Together with NASA, and our many corporate partners, we welcome you to follow along with JPSS-1 on its spectacular journey to space. Go Polar!


CubeSats Fly with JPSS-1

March 28, 2017

Did you know that there will be CubeSats launched alongside NOAA’s JPSS-1 later this year? The CubeSats are part of the Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) program which is part of NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative.

Read more here.


NOAA’s JPSS-1 Satellite Begins Environmental Testing

April 27, 2016

NOAA’s JPSS-1 satellite, the second in the JPSS series of satellites, slated to launch in 2017, is currently going through environmental testing. Environmental testing simulates the harsh environments the satellite may experience during launch and once in orbit. The JPSS-1 satellite and its instruments will undergo a variety of rigorous tests during the environmental testing period, which include subjecting it to acoustics, vibration, electromagnetic, thermal vacuum conditions and compatibility testing with the ground system.

Read More here.


All Instruments Now Integrated with Spacecraft

February 11, 2016

The final instrument to be integrated with NOAA’s Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) satellite is now complete, moving the spacecraft development towards launch as planned in early 2017. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) instrument is the fifth and final instrument to be integrated with the JPSS-1 spacecraft. It follows the successful integration of the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite-Nadir (OMPS-N), the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instruments.

Read more here


Solar Array Successfully Completes Deployment Testing

September 30, 2015

The solar panel array on NOAA's polar-orbiting satellite JPSS-1 spacecraft successfully completed deployment testing at Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in a cleanroom facility near where the JPSS-1 satellite is undergoing integration and test.

Read more here.


Cross-track Infrared Sounder Instrument Now Integrated on Spacecraft

April 9, 2015

The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), which will fly aboard NOAA’s Joint Polar Satellite System-1 satellite, has been successfully integrated with the spacecraft. CrIS is the fourth instrument to be integrated on the JPSS-1 spacecraft.

Read more here.


NOAA’s JPSS-1 Satellite Imaging Instrument Successfully Integrated on Spacecraft

March 10, 2015

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) has been successfully integrated onboard NOAA’s Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) satellite. The VIIRS instrument, built by the Raytheon Company in El Segundo, California, is the third instrument to be integrated on the spacecraft by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in Boulder, Colorado.

Read more here.


Second JPSS-1 Instrument Integrated with Satellite

January 23, 2015

The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite-Nadir (OMPS-N) instrument has been successfully integrated with the JPSS-1 spacecraft, NOAA announced today. OMPS is the second JPSS-1 instrument to be integrated after the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) was installed last month. OMPS-N was built by Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado where the integration also took place. JPSS-1 is the next polar-orbiting NOAA satellite in the JPSS constellation and is scheduled to be launched in 2017.

Read more here.


First JPSS-1 Instrument Integrated with Satellite

December 17, 2014

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument that will fly on the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 spacecraft (JPSS-1), NOAA's next polar orbiting environmental satellite, has been successfully integrated with the spacecraft. CERES is the first JPSS-1 instrument to be integrated, marking the start of a new phase in the completion of the satellites’ development. CERES was built by Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems in Redondo Beach, California and was shipped to Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in Boulder, Colorado for integration.

Read more here.


First JPSS-1 Satellite Instrument is Ready for Installation

April 24, 2014

The first of five instruments that will fly on JPSS-1, NOAA's next polar orbiting environmental satellite, successfully completed pre-shipment review last week. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) measures reflected sunlight and thermal radiation emitted by the Earth and builds on the highly successful legacy instruments flown on NOAA's previous Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) and NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) missions.

Read more here.


JPSS-1 Spacecraft Completes Delta Critical Design Review

January 15, 2013

A four-day delta Critical Design Review (dCDR) of work conducted by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., of Boulder, Colo., was held in December 2012 with representatives from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.; NASA Headquarters, Washington; the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington; and JPSS instrument providers.  

Read more here.