NOAA -- The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

JPSS-1

 

LIFT OFF! NOAA’s JPSS-1 Heads to Orbit

Nov 18, 2017

Delta II Rocket Liftoff!

The Joint Polar Satellite System-1 lifted off from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, at 1:47 a.m. PST this morning. The satellite’s next-generation technology will help improve the timeliness and accuracy of U.S. weather forecasts three to seven days out.

“The value of the new JPSS satellite cannot be understated after this tragic hurricane season,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “JPSS offers an unparalleled perspective on our planet’s weather, granting NOAA advanced insights which will be used to guard American lives and communities.”

JPSS-1 will be renamed NOAA-20 when it reaches its final orbit. Scientists and forecasters will be able to use the satellite’s data officially after its five advanced instruments, all significantly upgraded from those on NOAA’s previous polar-orbiting satellites, complete three months of tests. The satellite is designed to operate for seven years, with the potential for several more years.

“This year’s hurricane and fire seasons demonstrated just how critical NOAA’s Earth observing satellites are for forecasting extreme weather and hazardous events,” said Rear Admiral Timothy Gallaudet, Ph.D., acting NOAA administrator. “JPSS joins the recently launched GOES-16 satellite to provide forecasters unprecedented access to high quality data needed for accurate forecasts, which save lives, protects property and safeguards our economic livelihood.”

The data these advanced instruments provide will improve weather forecasting, such as predicting a hurricane’s track, and aid in the recognition of climate patterns that can influence the weather, including El Nino and La Nina. They will also help emergency managers respond to events like wildfires and volcanic eruptions and help communities, recovering from severe storms, with better views of storm damage and show the extent of power outages. The data also will be available to aid scientists monitor changes in our environment.

“Building and launching JPSS-1 underscores NOAA’s commitment to putting the most scientifically advanced satellites as possible into orbit, giving our forecasters – and the public – greater confidence in weather forecasts up to seven days in advance, including the potential for severe or dangerous weather,” said Stephen Volz, Ph.D., director of NOAA’s Satellite and Information Service.   

JPSS-1 will join the NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite in the same polar orbit, and will also provide scientists with observations of atmospheric temperature and moisture, clouds, sea-surface temperature, ocean color, sea ice cover, volcanic ash, and fire detection. 

“Emergency managers increasingly rely on our forecasts to make critical decisions and take appropriateaction before a storm hits,” said Louis W. Uccellini, director of NOAA’s National Weather Service. “Polar satellite observations not only help us monitor and collect information about current weather systems, but they provide data to feed into our weather forecast models.” 

Together, NOAA and NASA oversee the development, launch, testing and operation all the satellites in the JPSS program. NOAA funds and manages the program, operations and data products. On behalf of NOAA, NASA develops and builds the instruments, spacecraft and ground system and launches the satellites which NOAA then takes over to operate.

“Today’s launch is the latest example of the strong relationship between NASA and NOAA, contributing to the advancement of scientific discovery and the improvement of the U.S. weather forecasting capability by leveraging the unique vantage point of space to benefit and protect humankind,” said Sandra Smalley, director, NASA’s Joint Agency Satellite Division.

Ball Aerospace designed and built the JPSS-1 satellite bus and Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite instrument, integrated all five of the spacecraft’s instruments and performed satellite-level testing and launch support. Raytheon Corporation built the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite and the Common Ground System. Harris Corporation built the Cross-track Infrared Sounder. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems built the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System instrument.     


Launch Rescheduled for Saturday, 11/18

Nov 16, 2017

United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket from Space Launch Photo

The launch of NOAA's Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) satellite, the first in a new series of four highly advanced polar-orbiting satellites, is now scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 18, from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.
 
Liftoff aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket from Space Launch Complex 2 is targeted for 4:47 a.m. EST (1:47 a.m. PST).
 
NASA TV live launch coverage will begin at 4:15 a.m. EST on Nov. 18 and conclude after the CubeSat deployment. 

If you’re not going to make it to California to see NOAA's JPSS-1 rocket into space, don’t worry! You can watch it live wherever you are via the NASA website!

NASA TV will begin live coverage of the launch beginning at 4:15 a.m. EST, 1:15 a.m. PST on Nov. 18th.

You can watch liftoff LIVE at: www.nasa.gov/nasatv 

And tweet along with @NOAASatellites using #JPSS1

 

 

Second Launch Attempt Scrubbed

Nov 15, 2017

The second attempt to launch NOAA's JPSS1 satellite on November 15 at 1:47 am was scrubbed due to excessive upper level winds. The team is assessing their options. We will update this page with the latest information as we get it.


Launch Delayed: Next Attempt on 11/15

Nov 14, 2017

Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. (Nov. 14, 2017) – The launch of a United Launch Alliance Delta II carrying the JPSS-1 mission for NASA and NOAA was scrubbed today due to a red range and a late launch vehicle alarm. Due to the short window there was insufficient time to fully coordinate a resolution.
 
The launch is planned for Wednesday, Nov. 15, from Space Launch Complex-2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. The launch time is 1:47 a.m. PT.


Inside the World of JPSS-1 

Nov 14, 2017

In 2017, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with the support of their partners at The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), will launch the JPSS-1 satellite, the first operational satellite in NOAA’s next generation polar-orbiting satellite system. 

This video takes you inside the world of JPSS-1, providing a look at some of the satellite’s incredible instruments and explaining its journey to space. Join us as we see it off on its mission to continue vital contributions to United States weather forecasting!

Learn more about JPSS-1 and its mission at http://www.jpss.noaa.gov


JPSS-1 An Indispensable Tool in Weather Forecasting

Nov 13, 2017

Once in orbit, NOAA's #JPSS1 will circle the globe 14 times per day, affording the satellite two complete views of the weather around the world every 24 hours!

Data from JPSS-1 will support a broad range of environmental monitoring applications including weather analysis and forecasting, climate research and prediction, global sea surface temperature measurements, atmospheric soundings of temperature and humidity, ocean dynamics research, volcanic eruption monitoring, forest fire detection, global vegetation analysis, search and rescue, and many other applications. The most important function of JPSS, however, is that it will increase the timeliness and accuracy of forecasts three to seven days in advance of a severe weather event. NOAA's National Weather Service uses JPSS data as a critical input for numerical forecast models, providing the basis for these mid-range forecasts.

JPSS satellites also provide support for zero- to three-day operational forecasting, which is particularly important in Polar Regions where other observational data are sparse. In Alaska, JPSS provides critical data for nearly all of the weather forecasting for aviation, as well as the economically vital maritime, oil and gas industries.


Watch JPSS-1 Pre-Launch and Launch Coverage

Nov 13, 2017

Watch JPSS-1 Pre-Launch and Launch Coverage

“T- 3..2..1..Liftoff!” Coverage begins Tue., Nov. 14 at 1:15 am PST (4:15 EST) and be sure to Follow the #Countdowntolaunch on Twitter! when the launch of the Delta II rocket carrying JPSS-1 begins, will you be able to keep up with the launch day lingo?

To give you a head start, check out the following list of the most common terms, abbreviations and phrases you might hear during the JPSS-1satellite launch!

L- and T-  L- (pronounced "L minus”) refers to the days, hours, and minutes remaining in the scheduled countdown to launch, which occurs at L-0. The “L” stands for launch.

T- (pronounced "T minus”) refers to the time remaining on the official countdown clock. The “T” stands for time. During planned holds in the countdown process (when the countdown clock is intentionally stopped), the T- time also stops. The L- time, however, is synced to the clock on the wall and continues to advance.

Liftoff - Liftoff denotes the exact moment when the rocket, with the satellite onboard, begins to leave the launch pad under its own power, beginning its journey to space.

MECO “Main Engine Cut-Off” and SECO “Second Engine Cut-Off” - MECO refers to the moment when the Upper Stage has completed a main engine burn and cuts off, entering a coasting phase. JPSS-1 will go through one main engine start and cut-off, and two second-stage ignitions and cut-offs on its way to polar orbit.

Now that you know what these terms mean, follow the launch on Twitter @NOAASatellites and NASATV. Coverage begins Tue., Nov. 14 at 1:15 am PST (4:15 EST) and be sure to Follow the #Countdowntolaunch on Twitter!


Watch JPSS-1 Pre-Launch and Launch Coverage

Nov 12, 2017

Watch the JPSS-1 Launch Press Conferences

If you’re not going to make it to California to see NOAA's JPSS-1 rocket into space, don’t worry! You can watch it live wherever you are via the NASA website!

NASA TV will begin live coverage of the launch beginning at 4:15 a.m. EST, 1:15 a.m. PST on Nov. 14 and conclude after the CubeSat deployment.

You can watch liftoff LIVE at: www.nasa.gov/nasatv 

Prelaunch and launch day coverage of the JPSS-1 flight will be available on http://www.nasa.gov. Coverage will include live streaming and blog updates beginning at 4:15 a.m. EST Nov. 14 as the countdown milestones occur. You can follow countdown coverage on our launch blog at https://blogs.nasa.gov/jpss.

However you decide to watch the launch, don't forget to LIVE tweet during the main event! Use the hashtag #JPSS1!

NASA TV will also air two JPSS-1 prelaunch news briefings on Wednesday, Nov. 8. Both briefings will be broadcast from NASA’s Press Site Auditorium at Vandenberg Air Force Base.

You can watch the press conference and science briefing LIVE at: www.nasa.gov/nasatv 

The prelaunch news conference will be held at 4 p.m. EST.

Briefing participants will be:

  • Steve Volz, director, NOAA’s Satellite and Information Service
  • Greg Mandt, director, Joint Polar Satellite System Program
  • Sandra Smalley, director, Joint Agency Satellite Division, NASA Headquarters
  • Omar Baez, NASA launch director
  • Scott Messer, United Launch Alliance program manager for NASA missions
  • Capt. Ross Malugani, launch weather officer, Vandenberg Air Force Base 30th Space Wing

Following the prelaunch news conference, a science briefing will be held at 5:30 p.m.

Briefing participants will be:

  • Mitch Goldberg, NOAA chief program scientist, Joint Polar Satellite System
  • Joe Pica, director, NOAA’s National Weather Service Office of Observations
  • James Gleason, NASA senior project scientist, Joint Polar Satellite System
  • Jana Luis, division chief, predictive services, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection

JPSS-1 Instruments

Nov 10, 2017

An Image Illustration of JPSS-1 with the instruments that are described in the article

NOAA's JPSS-1, belongs to the nation’s next generation of polar-orbiting environmental satellites. Thanks to these five state-of-the-art instruments, JPSS1 is able to provide sophisticated meteorological data and observations of the Earth’s atmosphere, land and oceans:

  • The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS), which provides atmospheric temperature and moisture data for operational weather and climate applications.
  • The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), which provides more accurate, detailed atmospheric temperature and moisture observations for weather and climate applications.
  • The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), which collects visible and infrared imagery and global observations of land, atmosphere, cryosphere and oceans.
  • The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), which tracks the health of the ozone layer and measures the concentration of ozone in the Earth’s atmosphere. 
  • The Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES), which measures reflected sunlight and thermal radiation emitted by the Earth.


To learn more about JPSS1's sweet suite of cutting-edge hardware and how it will support the JPSS mission, visit the JPSS website


JPSS-1 Launch Rescheduled

Nov 8, 2017

An image illustration of the JPSS-1 Satellite

JPSS-1 is scheduled to launch on Tue., Nov. 14 at 1:47 a.m. PST (4:47 a.m. EST) from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

The Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) satellite, the first in a new series of four highly advanced National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar-orbiting satellites, now is scheduled to launch on Tuesday, Nov. 14, from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

Liftoff aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket from Space Launch Complex 2 is targeted for 1:47 a.m. PST (4:47 a.m. EST). 

JPSS represents a significant technological and scientific advancements in observations used for severe weather prediction and environmental monitoring. The JPSS system will help increase weather forecast accuracy from three to seven days.

Prelaunch and Science Briefing Nov. 12

NASA TV will air two JPSS-1 prelaunch news briefings on Sunday, Nov. 12. A prelaunch status briefing will be held at 4 p.m. EST, followed by a science briefing at 5:30 p.m. 

NASA TV Launch Coverage

NASA TV live launch coverage will begin at 4:15 a.m. EST on Nov. 14 and conclude after the CubeSat deployment. 

You can watch liftoff LIVE at: https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html#public 

NASA Web Prelaunch and Launch Coverage

Prelaunch and launch day coverage of the JPSS-1 flight will be available on http://www.nasa.gov. Coverage will include live streaming and blog updates beginning at 4:15 a.m. EST Nov. 14 as the countdown milestones occur. You can follow countdown coverage on our launch blog at https://blogs.nasa.gov/jpss.

JPSS is a collaborative effort between NOAA and NASA.


Spotlight on the JPSS Launch Vehicle

Nov 8, 2017

An illustration of the Delta II Rocket Launch Vehicle

At launch time, JPSS-1 will weigh 5,025 pounds, so getting it from Earth to space will require quite an effort. Fortunately, we have a launch vehicle that’s up to the task.

JPSS-1 will rocket into space into polar orbit aboard 128-foot Delta II 7920-10 rocket consisting of a booster stage, hypergolic second stage, nine solid rocket motors and a 10-foot diameter payload fairing. (Whew!)

The JPSS-1 launch will mark the 53rd Delta II mission for NASA and 154th launch since the rocket’s first launch in 1989. Previous Delta II missions for NASA include the Spirit and Opportunity Mars rovers as well as Suomi NPP, the precursor to the next-generation polar-orbiting satellite in the JPSS series.

To learn more about the vehicle that will take JPSS-1 to the stars, go to https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/content/jpss-1-spacecraft


JPSS and Its Instruments

Nov 6, 2017

JPSS-1 Illustration that shows all of the high-tech instruments aboard the spacecraft

Thanks to its five advanced instruments, the soon-to-launch JPSS-1 will gather global measurements of atmospheric, terrestrial and oceanic conditions, including sea and land surface temperatures, vegetation, clouds, rainfall, snow and ice cover, fire locations and smoke plumes, atmospheric temperature, water vapor and ozone. 
 
Learn more about it sweet suite of cutting edge instruments – ATMS, CERES, CrLS, OMPS and VIIRS – at http://www.jpss.noaa.gov/mission_and_instruments.html

When JPSS-1 rockets into space on November 10, the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instrument will be one of the instruments along for the ride. Do you know what CrIS is designed to do? Will it:

  1. Provide accurate, detailed atmospheric temperature and moisture observations for weather and climate applications.
  2. Measure reflected sunlight and thermal radiation emitted by the Earth.
  3. Track the health of the ozone layer and measure the concentration of ozone in the Earth's atmosphere.
  4. Measure reflected sunlight and thermal radiation emitted by the Earth.

To find out, go to http://www.jpss.noaa.gov/mission_and_instruments.html. While you’re there, learn about all of the high-tech instruments aboard the spacecraft how they’ll each pitch-in to provide scientists with a vast array of data re: Earth’s climate!


What Is a Polar Orbit Anyway?

Nov 3, 2017

This image from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard the NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite shows the Aurora Borealis (aka: the Northern Lights) over Alaska during the early morning hours of November 10, 2016. Auroras are caused when charged particles from the Sun, mainly electrons and protons, interact with the upper atmosphere, and from its position 530 miles above the Earth, Suomi NPP can detect these upper-atmospheric events with the aid of the VIIRS instrument's Day- Night Band.

Every year on June 18, the residents of Fairbanks, Alaska, celebrate the Midnight Sun Festival. As its name implies, the annual soiree is a celebration of the “midnight sun” -- the natural phenomenon that occurs near the summer solstice wherein the sun is visible for 24 hours (assuming fair weather). 

With the sun up for a full 24-hours, neither the NOAA-NASA Suomi NPP satellite nor the soon-to-launch JPSS-1 will need the Day-Night Band to get a good look at Alaska. In the winter, though, it's a much different story. 

According to Eric Stevens of The Geographic Information Network of Alaska, the Day-Night Band (DNB) offered by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument is, "probably the single most important piece of the VIIRS instrument to the National Weather Service in Alaska." Why? Because as Stevens puts it, "The instrument is so sensitive you can see visible-spectrum light at night! It's better than night-vision goggles!" 

To learn why Suomi NPP's Day-Night Band is so important for weather forecasting in the 49th state, check out this video featuring Eric Stevens of the Geographic Information Network of Alaska.  


What Is a Polar Orbit Anyway?

Nov 1, 2017

Did you know that the satellites of the Joint Polar Satellite System will travel in what’s called a “polar orbit”? This means that JPSS satellites will circle the Earth, from north pole to south pole, over and over as it spins. Further, the satellites travel so fast that in a 24-hour period, they will circle the planet 14 times and glimpse the weather around the entire globe twice a day! 

As they travel around the Earth, JPSS satellites will pick up a lot of data about the planet’s atmosphere, land, and oceans. This data should be data used to support a broad range of applications, including weather analysis and forecasting, climate research and prediction, global sea surface temperature measurements, atmospheric soundings of temperature and humidity, ocean dynamics research, volcanic eruption monitoring, forest fire detection, global vegetation analysis, search and rescue, and more!

Get the skinny on polar orbits and the path  the soon-to-launch #JPSS1 satellite will travel as it circumnavigates the globe in this video

Meet JPSS 

October 30 , 2017

An image illustration of the JPSS-1 Satellite

JPSS (short for Joint Polar Satellite System) is a series of high tech satellites that will keep an eye on the weather and environment. These satellites will circle the Earth from North Pole to South Pole 14 times each day as the planet spins below. This allows JPSS to see the whole Earth twice every day! 

JPSS-1—the first satellite in the JPSS series—is scheduled to launch November 10, 2017. It has a suite of advanced instruments to collect information about what’s happening in the atmosphere, on the land, and on the surface of the oceans. From its orbit 512 miles above Earth, JPSS-1 will help us:

  • Create more accurate weather forecasts up to 7 days in advance.
  • Track how the weather affects plants, including forests and the crops that grow our food.
  • Monitor ocean health by taking detailed measurements of water temperature and color.
  • Keep tabs on the atmosphere to create earlier warnings of severe weather.
  • Watch for volcanoes and forest fires around the world to monitor air quality and enhance public safety.

NOAA’s #JPSS1 rockets into space in just 12 days! Before it lifts off and begins its mission, take a moment to get acquainted!

Watch this video and stay up to date on the latest JPSS developments via the JPSS-1 launch page at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4Cx5Zs-aL0&feature=youtu.be

You can also learn more about the spacecraft’s instruments and mission on the Joint Polar Satellite Systems website at https://www.jpss.noaa.gov.


Typhoon Lan Spins in the Northwest Pacific 

October 19, 2017

A satellite image of the Typhoon Lan spins in the northwestern Pacific Ocean

Typhoon Lan spins in the northwestern Pacific Ocean in this true-color image captured by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on the NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite. A VIIRS instrument will also be flying on JPSS-1, set to launch on November 10, 2017.

According to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, Lan is located approximately 427 nautical miles south-southeast of Okinawa, Japan, and has maximum sustained winds of 90 knots with gusts of 110 knots. The storm is moving to the north-northwest at about 9 knots.

True-color imagery like this is created by combining data from VIIRS's red, green, and blue channels into one composite image. In addition, data from several other channels may be included to cancel out or correct atmospheric interference that may blur parts of the image.

To see more VIIRS true-color imagery, visit NOAA View.


CHAT LIVE with NOAA Scientists about the Launch of JPSS-1!

October 2, 2017

NOAA's JPSS-1 satellite, the first of the new JPSS satellite constellation, will rocket into space on November 10, 2017. Don't miss the chance to chat live with two NOAA scientists and learn more about the satellite, its mission, the launch and the science behind it all!

Join our Reddit Science AMA on Thursday, October 12, 2017, from 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm Eastern and "ask these experts anything!"

For years, Dr. Mitch Goldberg, JPSS Chief Program Scientist, and Thomas Wrublewski, NOAA Physical Scientist, have been working with their Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) colleagues to prepare this next-generation polar-orbiting satellite for its trip into space. Now, the big day is almost here!

JPSS-1, or NOAA-20 as it will be known once it reaches orbit, will provide sophisticated meteorological data and observations of atmosphere, ocean and land. NOAA’s National Weather Service (NWS) will use JPSS data as critical input for numerical forecast models, providing the basis for three- to seven-day forecasts.

According to the NWS, 85% of the data flowing into our weather forecast models come from polar-orbiting satellites, such as Suomi NPP and, soon, the new JPSS series. Polar satellite data also provides emergency personnel with more accurate forecasts, allowing them to pre-position equipment and resources days before a storm. JPSS will continue to serve this vital role.

You can learn more about the JPSS-1 satellite series and see the countdown to launch on our website.

https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/JPSS-1

 

Details:

Who: 

Dr. Mitch Goldberg

Dr. Mitch Goldberg, JPSS Chief Program Scientist;

Photo of Thomas Wrublewsi, NOAA Physical Scientist

Thomas Wrublewski, NOAA Physical Scientist

What:

Reddit Science "Ask Me Anything" (AMA). Reddit is an online community where users vote on content and is a popular platform to host  “Ask Me Anything” chats  (Reddit AMAs) with subject matter expert(s).
 
Where:

Please go to this URL to join the conversation https://redd.it/75wrix

 


VIIRS Sees Irma-Churned Sediments around Florida, Bahamas

October 2, 2017

A satellite image of the Hurricane Irma

Hurricane Irma didn't just impact land. As seen in these before-and-after true-color images captured by the VIIRS instrument on the NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite, the storm altered the distribution of sand around the coast of Florida. The light blue color shows sediment suspended in the water, kicked up by the intensity of the storm. 

Click here to learn more.

 


NOAA’s JPSS-1 Satellite Arrives in California for Launch

September 5, 2017

Before JPSS-1 launches into space this November, it had to travel from Colorado to California. To see how it got there, check out our new photo essay!

 

Before JPSS-1 launches into space this November, it had to travel from Colorado to California. To see how it got there, check out our new photo essay!

 

NOAA's Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) satellite arrived at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Sept. 1, 2017, to begin preparations for a November launch.

After its arrival, the JPSS-1 spacecraft was pulled from its shipping container, and is being prepared for encapsulation on top of the rocket that will take it to its polar orbit at an altitude of 512 miles (824 km) above Earth.

JPSS-1 is scheduled to be launched aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket from Space Launch Complex-2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Nov. 10, 2017, at 1:47 a.m., PST.

JPSS-1, which will be known as NOAA-20 after it reaches orbit, has a seven-year design life. NOAA partnered with NASA to implement the JPSS series of U.S. civilian polar-orbiting environmental remote sensing satellites and sensors. JPSS-1 is the first in a series of NOAA’s four next-generation, polar-orbiting weather satellites.

Launched in 2011, the joint NOAA/NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP), is a bridge between NASA's Earth Observing System of satellites and JPSS. Suomi NPP has been operating as NOAA’s primary operational satellite for global weather observations since May 2014.

JPSS-1 will orbit in the same plane as Suomi NPP, with JPSS-1 operating about 50 minutes ahead of Suomi NPP, allowing important overlap in observational coverage. It takes about 14 passes for each satellite in this orbit to cover Earth's surface. 

The sensor capabilities for JPSS-1 have similar capabilities to those on Suomi NPP: the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS), built by Northrop Grumman; theCross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), built by Harris; the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite-Nadir (OMPS-N), built by Ball Aerospace;  the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), built by Northrop Grumman; and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), built by Raytheon.

JPSS fulfills NOAA’s requirements to collect global multi-spectral radiometry and other specialized meteorological and oceanographic data, by remote sensing of land, sea and the atmosphere. These data support NOAA’s abilities to continuously observe Earth’s environment to better understand and predict changes in weather, climate, oceans and coasts, which supports the Nation’s economy and protect lives and property.

For more information, please visit www.jpss.noaa.gov

 


JPSS-1 Has New Target Launch Date

September 1, 2017

JPSS-1 Spacecraft Photo
Credit: Ball Aerospace

The launch of JPSS-1, the first in a series of NOAA’s four next-generation operational polar-orbiting weather satellites that will give scientists the most advanced tools to aid in weather forecasting and earth observations, is scheduled for November 10 at 1:47 a.m. PST from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. 

“Hurricane Harvey is a stark reminder of the importance of the NOAA satellite program,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families affected by this disaster.”

These advanced Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) satellites will serve as the backbone of NOAA’s weather forecasting system for the next 20 years, providing the reliable, global observations required to support accurate numerical weather forecasts up to seven days in advance.

The new launch date has given engineers extra time to complete testing of the spacecraft and instrument electronics and to finish work on the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder, one of the primary instruments on JPSS. The satellite carries five state-of-the-art instruments providing a comprehensive suite of earth observations. 

“The JPSS-1 team has done an incredible job getting this extremely capable satellite prepared for launch and ready to send back quality environmental data soon after it is in orbit,” said Stephen Volz, Ph.D., director, NOAA’s Satellite and Information Service.

The satellite is scheduled to arrive in California just before the Labor Day weekend, where it will undergo final preparation before it is launched aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket. When it reaches orbit, JPSS-1 will be renamed NOAA-20.

Following launch, JPSS-1 will join Suomi NPP, the joint NOAA-NASA weather satellite giving the United States two, highly sophisticated satellites, each circling the Earth 14 times per day, providing full, global observations for U.S. weather prediction. Suomi NPP, which initially was planned as a research and risk reduction mission when it launched on October 28, 2011, became NOAA’s primary operational satellite for global weather observations on May 1, 2014.

Ball Aerospace designed and built the JPSS-1 satellite bus and Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite instrument, integrated all five of the spacecraft’s instruments and performed satellite-level testing and launch support. Raytheon Corporation built the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite and built the common ground system. Harris Corporation built the Cross-track Infrared Sounder. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems built the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System instrument.

NOAA works in partnership with NASA on all JPSS missions, ensuring a continuous series of global weather data to secure a more "Weather-Ready” Nation.


Suomi NPP Sees Iceberg Larger than London

July 18, 2017

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite captured these Day-Night Band (top) and I-05 longwave infrared band (below) images of the Larsen C ice shelf, which calved an immense iceberg sometime between July 10 and the morning of July 12, 2017.

Scientists from Project Midas, a UK-based Antarctic research project, estimate that the iceberg is approximately 2,240 square miles (5,800 square kilometers) -- more than three times the size of the greater London-area -- weighs more than 1-trillion tons and has a volume that is twice that of Lake Erie.

For more information, see our article, "Larsen C Ice Shelf Calves Large Iceberg.


#JPSS1 Social Takes Boulder by Storm

June 19, 2017

Photo of the NOAA and NASA Social Gurus Event Participants


Three months ahead of launch, NOAA and NASA hosted an event for social media gurus to showcase the JPSS-1 spacecraft and instrumentation. Twenty-five writers, bloggers, videographers, teachers, artists and meteorologists attended the JPSS NASA social on June 19, 2017 in Boulder, Colorado.

The day started with a tour of the NOAA facilities including the Space Weather Prediction Center and the National Weather Service for the Denver area, presentations by the Ozone and Water Vapor Group and   the National Centers for Environmental Information and demonstrations of JPSS data on the original Science on A Sphere display. After lunch, participants were given in-depth presentations on the JPSS-1 mission by the Program Director, Gregory Mandt, and the JPSS-1 Program Manager from Ball Aerospace, Alex Chernushin, and were able to interact with technical and scientific mission experts.
 

Photo of the NOAA and NASA Social Gurus Event Participants


Social media participants posted about JPSS before, during and after the event using the hashtag designation #jpss1. Reviews and post-event coverage, from several points of view, include the following articles, podcasts and videos:


We thank all of the participants, speakers, and experts for a successful and exciting day.


JPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction Teams Bridges the Gap between Data and Users

June 16, 2017

Smoke from the Fort McMurray Fire

Smoke from the Fort McMurray fire was swept up into a cyclonic spin over northern Canada.

The process of transforming raw satellite data into useful products is complex and continuously under improvement. Leading this effort for NOAA's Joint Polar Satellite Service (JPSS), is the JPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction (PGRR) team -- a group comprised of JPSS scientists and engineers, as well as representatives from user communities, such as the National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Forecasting Offices and the National Ocean Services.

Each year, PGRR team members come together to hear from the scientists developing the latest Suomi NPP and JPSS data sets, algorithms and products, and get feedback from users. This year, the PGRR team held its 2017 PGRR Project Review in late May at the University of Maryland. The multi-day event included presentations from scientists working in the focus areas of  hydrology, river ice and flooding, the arctic, oceans and coasts, fires and smoke; evaluations from end-users; and application-oriented focus groups that developed methodologies for implementing agreed-upon changes.

Based on the content of this year's review, it was clear that the PGRR program developed several successful products to help NWS and other users to leverage the capabilities of the instruments on board JPSS satellites and the data they produce to support key areas including weather, fires and flooding. Among them are:

Keeping Tabs on Alaska's Icy Rivers

River ice is a significant threat in Alaska where ice can dam and flood a river quickly. PGRR products are used to track ice and flooding conditions in this area and proved valuable in helping residents respond to a flooding event on the Yukon River in May 2013 and have been in use during Alaskan Spring ice break-up ever since.

Tracking Wildfire Smoke in the Atmosphere

The Fire and Smoke Initiative described how JPSS scientists were able to build on their success evaluating products during the Fort McMurray fire in Alberta, Canada in May 2016. VIIRS Day/Night Band imagery showed the fire's progression on consecutive nights and the team used its visualization products to show how smoke from the fire moved in the atmosphere.

Monitoring Marine Health with Sea Surface Temperature

The National Ocean Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service used Ocean and coastal products from JPSS pertaining to  ocean color, nighttime maps, and sea surface temperature, which is a critical measurement for coral reefs, in long and short-term efforts to conserve marine ecosystems.

To learn more about the JPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction (PGRR) team and it's continuous efforts to improve JPSS satellite data and products, visit the JPSS website.


Meet JPSS

May 17, 2017

 

As they orbit around the planet from pole to pole 14 times per day, the satellites of the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) will keeping an eye on the weather and taking constant measurements of Earth's atmosphere, land and oceans, collecting data used in weather forecasts and other essential products and services!

Before the first of the new JPSS satellite series rockets into space later this year, take a moment to get acquainted!


VIIRS Storms and Fires Images

May 10, 2017

The VIIRS images show massive storms and fires across several southern states.

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) will be one of the key science instruments on JPSS-1. The instrument was experimentally tested on the currently operational NOAA/NASA Suomi-NPP satellite and provides useful and important environmental monitoring. For instance, did you know the Southeast U.S. has been facing extreme weather elements this week?

The images above show massive storms and fires across several southern states. Storms brought devastating winds to Texas and Louisiana, resulting in power outages and even some ensuing tornadoes. Fires in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in Georgia have burned more than 130,000 acres and more than 500 people have been evacuated from their homes. VIIRS images are used to monitor and measure dangers weather phenomenon to help protect the public and local economies.


The Road to Launch

April 21, 2017

A picture of the JPSS-1 spacecraft was moved to a customized metal structure that goes into the thermal vacuum chamber prior to the spacecraft.

Welcome to the JPSS-1 “road to launch” page, and happy (almost) Earth Day! No satellites will do more to give us a full picture of our Earth than the satellites of the JPSS series, which provide vivid images and critical data on global environmental conditions twice daily.

This page is your first stop for the latest news and information about the road to launch for JPSS-1 and the JPSS series mission.

Using the tabs on the left you can also learn about the goals of the mission and the spacecraft, including the instruments aboard and the launch vehicle that will send JPSS-1 to space. Want more detail? We’ll provide helpful links to materials on the JPSS program site to get you to the right place.

Together with NASA, and our many corporate partners, we welcome you to follow along with JPSS-1 on its spectacular journey to space. Go Polar!


CubeSats Fly with JPSS-1

March 28, 2017

Did you know that there will be CubeSats launched alongside NOAA’s JPSS-1 later this year? The CubeSats are part of the Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) program which is part of NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative.

Read more here.


NOAA’s JPSS-1 Satellite Begins Environmental Testing

April 27, 2016

NOAA’s JPSS-1 satellite, the second in the JPSS series of satellites, slated to launch in 2017, is currently going through environmental testing. Environmental testing simulates the harsh environments the satellite may experience during launch and once in orbit. The JPSS-1 satellite and its instruments will undergo a variety of rigorous tests during the environmental testing period, which include subjecting it to acoustics, vibration, electromagnetic, thermal vacuum conditions and compatibility testing with the ground system.

Read More here.


All Instruments Now Integrated with Spacecraft

February 11, 2016

The final instrument to be integrated with NOAA’s Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) satellite is now complete, moving the spacecraft development towards launch as planned in early 2017. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) instrument is the fifth and final instrument to be integrated with the JPSS-1 spacecraft. It follows the successful integration of the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite-Nadir (OMPS-N), the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instruments.

Read more here


Solar Array Successfully Completes Deployment Testing

September 30, 2015

The solar panel array on NOAA's polar-orbiting satellite JPSS-1 spacecraft successfully completed deployment testing at Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in a cleanroom facility near where the JPSS-1 satellite is undergoing integration and test.

Read more here.


Cross-track Infrared Sounder Instrument Now Integrated on Spacecraft

April 9, 2015

The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), which will fly aboard NOAA’s Joint Polar Satellite System-1 satellite, has been successfully integrated with the spacecraft. CrIS is the fourth instrument to be integrated on the JPSS-1 spacecraft.

Read more here.


NOAA’s JPSS-1 Satellite Imaging Instrument Successfully Integrated on Spacecraft

March 10, 2015

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) has been successfully integrated onboard NOAA’s Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) satellite. The VIIRS instrument, built by the Raytheon Company in El Segundo, California, is the third instrument to be integrated on the spacecraft by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in Boulder, Colorado.

Read more here.


Second JPSS-1 Instrument Integrated with Satellite

January 23, 2015

The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite-Nadir (OMPS-N) instrument has been successfully integrated with the JPSS-1 spacecraft, NOAA announced today. OMPS is the second JPSS-1 instrument to be integrated after the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) was installed last month. OMPS-N was built by Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado where the integration also took place. JPSS-1 is the next polar-orbiting NOAA satellite in the JPSS constellation and is scheduled to be launched in 2017.

Read more here.


First JPSS-1 Instrument Integrated with Satellite

December 17, 2014

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument that will fly on the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 spacecraft (JPSS-1), NOAA's next polar orbiting environmental satellite, has been successfully integrated with the spacecraft. CERES is the first JPSS-1 instrument to be integrated, marking the start of a new phase in the completion of the satellites’ development. CERES was built by Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems in Redondo Beach, California and was shipped to Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in Boulder, Colorado for integration.

Read more here.


First JPSS-1 Satellite Instrument is Ready for Installation

April 24, 2014

The first of five instruments that will fly on JPSS-1, NOAA's next polar orbiting environmental satellite, successfully completed pre-shipment review last week. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) measures reflected sunlight and thermal radiation emitted by the Earth and builds on the highly successful legacy instruments flown on NOAA's previous Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) and NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) missions.

Read more here.


JPSS-1 Spacecraft Completes Delta Critical Design Review

January 15, 2013

A four-day delta Critical Design Review (dCDR) of work conducted by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., of Boulder, Colo., was held in December 2012 with representatives from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.; NASA Headquarters, Washington; the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington; and JPSS instrument providers.  

Read more here.