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Jason-2

 


An artist's rendering of the Jason-2 satellite in orbit in front of field of stars and galaxies.

An artist's rendering of the Jason-2 satellite in space. (Image credit: Eumetsat)

Jason-2, also known as the Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM), launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on June 20, 2008, aboard a Delta II 7320 rocket. The Jason-2 mission is an international project, bringing together NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) , CNES (National Centre for Space Studies) , and EUMETSAT (European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites). Jason-2 is a polar-orbiting satellite that continues the climate record of sea surface height measurements first started by Topex/Poseidon in 1992 and Jason-1 in 2001.


Wave height measurements from Jason-2 and Jason-3 over North Atlantic
Wave height measurements from Jason-2 and Jason-3
over the North Atlantic` (Image credit: NOAA)

Jason-2 provides data and information regarding global sea level rise, ocean circulation, climate change, and large-scale climate events like El Niño and La Niña. Data can be used for forecasting hurricanes, improving the safety and efficiency of offshore industry operations, routing ships, managing fisheries, and monitoring river and lake levels.


Similar to Jason-1, Jason-2’s primary payload includes five instruments: altimeter, radiometer, and three location systems that help measure the satellite’s precise position within orbit.


Although still in operation and providing data, Jason-2 is now supplementing the primary satellite Jason-3 (launched in 2016).


Jason-2 measuring ocean wave height over the ocean
An artist's rendering of Jason-2 measuring ocean wave height over the ocean.
Note that the vertical height from the satellite to the ocean has been
dramatically reduced in this image. (Image credit: NASA JPL-CalTech)

For more information about Jason-3, please visit the: