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LIFT OFF! NOAA’s JPSS-1 heads to orbit

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LIFT OFF! NOAA’s JPSS-1 heads to orbit
New polar satellite will improve weather forecasts out to seven days

November 18, 2017

LIFT OFF! NOAA’s JPSS-1 heads to orbit New polar satellite will improve weather forecasts out to seven days

Contact:

John Leslie, john.leslie@noaa.gov, 202-527-3504 (cell)
Brady Phillips, brady.phillips@noaa.gov, 202-407-1298 (cell)

The Joint Polar Satellite System-1, the first in a new series of four highly advanced NOAA polar-orbiting satellites, lifted off from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, at 1:47 a.m. PST this morning. The satellite’s next-generation technology will help improve the timeliness and accuracy of U.S. weather forecasts three to seven days out.
 
“The value of the new JPSS satellite cannot be understated after this tragic hurricane season,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “JPSS offers an unparalleled perspective on our planet’s weather, granting NOAA advanced insights which will be used to guard American lives and communities.”
 
JPSS-1 will be renamed NOAA-20 when it reaches its final orbit. Scientists and forecasters will be able to use the satellite’s data officially after its five advanced instruments, all significantly upgraded from those on NOAA’s previous polar-orbiting satellites, complete three months of tests. The satellite is designed to operate for seven years, with the potential for several more years.
 
“This year’s hurricane and fire seasons demonstrated just how critical NOAA’s Earth observing satellites are for forecasting extreme weather and hazardous events,” said Rear Admiral Timothy Gallaudet, Ph.D., acting NOAA administrator. “JPSS joins the recently launched GOES-16 satellite to provide forecasters unprecedented access to high quality data needed for accurate forecasts, which save lives, protects property and safeguards our economic livelihood.”
 
The data these advanced instruments provide will improve weather forecasting, such as predicting a hurricane’s track, and aid in the recognition of climate patterns that can influence the weather, including El Nino and La Nina. They will also help emergency managers respond to events like wildfires and volcanic eruptions and help communities, recovering from severe storms, with better views of storm damage and show the extent of power outages. The data also will be available to aid scientists monitor changes in our environment.
 
“Building and launching JPSS-1 underscores NOAA’s commitment to putting the most scientifically advanced satellites as possible into orbit, giving our forecasters – and the public – greater confidence in weather forecasts up to seven days in advance, including the potential for severe or dangerous weather,” said Stephen Volz, Ph.D., director of NOAA’s Satellite and Information Service.   
 
JPSS-1 will join the NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite in the same polar orbit, and will also provide scientists with observations of atmospheric temperature and moisture, clouds, sea-surface temperature, ocean color, sea ice cover, volcanic ash, and fire detection.
 
“Emergency managers increasingly rely on our forecasts to make critical decisions and take appropriate action before a storm hits,” said Louis W. Uccellini, director of NOAA’s National Weather Service. “Polar satellite observations not only help us monitor and collect information about current weather systems, but they provide data to feed into our weather forecast models.” 
 
Together, NOAA and NASA oversee the development, launch, testing and operation all the satellites in the JPSS program. NOAA funds and manages the program, operations and data products. On behalf of NOAA, NASA develops and builds the instruments, spacecraft and ground system and launches the satellites which then NOAA takes over to operate.
 
“Today’s launch is the latest example of the strong relationship between NASA and NOAA, contributing to the advancement of scientific discovery and the improvement of the U.S. weather forecasting capability by leveraging the unique vantage point of space to benefit and protect humankind,” said Sandra Smalley, director, NASA’s Joint Agency Satellite Division.
 
Ball Aerospace designed and built the JPSS-1 satellite bus and Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite instrument, integrated all five of the spacecraft’s instruments and performed satellite-level testing and launch support. Raytheon Corporation built the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite and the Common Ground System. Harris Corporation built the Cross-track Infrared Sounder. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems built the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System instrument.     
 
For more information on JPSS-1, visit https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/jpss-1#liftoff.


JPSS-1 Has New Target Launch Date

September 1, 2017

JPSS-1 Spacecraft Photo
Credit: Ball Aerospace

The launch of JPSS-1, the first in a series of NOAA’s four next-generation operational polar-orbiting weather satellites that will give scientists the most advanced tools to aid in weather forecasting and earth observations, is scheduled for November 10 at 1:47 a.m. PST from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. 

“Hurricane Harvey is a stark reminder of the importance of the NOAA satellite program,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families affected by this disaster.”

These advanced Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) satellites will serve as the backbone of NOAA’s weather forecasting system for the next 20 years, providing the reliable, global observations required to support accurate numerical weather forecasts up to seven days in advance.

The new launch date has given engineers extra time to complete testing of the spacecraft and instrument electronics and to finish work on the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder, one of the primary instruments on JPSS. The satellite carries five state-of-the-art instruments providing a comprehensive suite of earth observations. 

“The JPSS-1 team has done an incredible job getting this extremely capable satellite prepared for launch and ready to send back quality environmental data soon after it is in orbit,” said Stephen Volz, Ph.D., director, NOAA’s Satellite and Information Service.

The satellite is scheduled to arrive in California just before the Labor Day weekend, where it will undergo final preparation before it is launched aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket. When it reaches orbit, JPSS-1 will be renamed NOAA-20.

Following launch, JPSS-1 will join Suomi NPP, the joint NOAA-NASA weather satellite giving the United States two, highly sophisticated satellites, each circling the Earth 14 times per day, providing full, global observations for U.S. weather prediction. Suomi NPP, which initially was planned as a research and risk reduction mission when it launched on October 28, 2011, became NOAA’s primary operational satellite for global weather observations on May 1, 2014.

Ball Aerospace designed and built the JPSS-1 satellite bus and Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite instrument, integrated all five of the spacecraft’s instruments and performed satellite-level testing and launch support. Raytheon Corporation built the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite and built the common ground system. Harris Corporation built the Cross-track Infrared Sounder. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems built the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System instrument.

NOAA works in partnership with NASA on all JPSS missions, ensuring a continuous series of global weather data to secure a more "Weather-Ready” Nation.


 
MEDIA ADVISORY: Experts gather at NOAA conference to discuss how to use advanced data from next-generation weather satellites
 
Next month, top public and private sector environmental satellite experts from around the world will meet in New York to discuss how to best use the data coming from next-generation weather satellites, such as NOAA’s GOES-R and the NOAA-NASA Joint Polar Satellite System, also known as JPSS
 
Both systems are equipped with breakthrough technology, producing more and better data and incredibly detailed imagery, potentially leading to more accurate forecasts.
 
This year’s conference, A New Era for NOAA Environmental Satellites, is hosted by the NOAA Cooperative Science Center for Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Technologies (CREST), and will also showcase collaborative research between college students and NOAA scientists.
 
The sessions over the four days are open to press, and experts will be onsite for interviews.
 
WHAT: 
 
NOAA Satellite Conference: A New Era for NOAA Environmental Satellites
 
WHO: 
 
  • Dr. Stephen Volz, acting Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental Observation and Prediction; assistant NOAA administrator, NOAA’s Satellite and Information Service
  • David A. Grimes, president, World Meteorological Organization 
  • Julian Baez, president, WMO Regional Association III
  • Yoshishige Shirakawa, senior coordinator for satellite systems, Japan Meteorological Agency
  • Dr. Park Hoon, director general, National Meteorological Satellite Center, Korea Meteorological Administration
  • Dr. Antonio Divino Moura, deputy director, Brazilian National Institute for Space Research
  • Dr. Yang Jun, director general, national meteorological center, China Meteorological Administration
 
WHEN:  
 
July 17 – 20, 9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Agenda available at www.nsc2017.org
 
WHERE: 
 
West 138th Street between Amsterdam and Convent Avenues
New York, New York
Subway: 1 train (IRT - Broadway Local) to West 137 Street - CCNY station
 

 

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