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NOAA Satellite Imagery of Hurricane Nate

NOAA GOES-16 Captures Tropical Storm Ophelia Forming Oct. 9th

 

Just as Nate dissipates over the US, Tropical Depression 17 has been upgraded to Tropical Storm Ophelia as it gathers strength in the Atlantic Ocean.

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NOAA GOES-16 Imagery of Nate Making Landfall Oct. 7th

 

NOAA GOES16 infrared imagery of Nate as it made landfall last night on the Gulf Coast. The tropical storm is weakening but heavy rainfall continues over the southeastern US, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Infrared satellite imagery, which detects heat radiating off of clouds and the surface of the Earth, can be "colorized" or "color-enhanced" to bring out certain aspects of the data. These color enhancements are useful to meteorologists because the colors enable them to pinpoint items of interest, such as cloud-top height. In this imagery, the darker areas signify taller clouds, which correlate with more intense areas of the storm.

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NOAA GOES-16 Satellite Captures Hurricane Nate Oct. 7th

 

 

NOAA GOES16 satellite captured this imagery over the past several hours (10:00AM-5:00PM EDT) which shows Hurricane Nate quickly approaching Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama coasts.

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Hurricane Nate Approaches Northern Gulf Coast Oct. 7th

 

 

Hurricane Nate is our 9th hurricane of the record breaking season so far, NOAA GOES16 satellite captured this geocolor imagery of sunrise over the storm this morning, Oct. 7th as it approaches the Gulf Coast.

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NOAA Satellite Imagery of Hurricane Jose and Maria

NOAA's GOES-16 Satellite Captures Sunrise over Hurricane Maria Sept. 26th 2017

Sunrise this morning (9.26.17) captured by NOAA's GOES-16 satellite. Hurricane Maria weakens but remains a large storm with winds extending 105 miles.

To see more satellite images of the storm check out @ https://goo.gl/CiuhJ1

Created by our partners at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, the experimental geocolor imagery enhancement displays geostationary satellite data in different ways depending on whether it is day or night. In daytime imagery (shown here), land and shallow-water features appear as they do in true-color imagery.

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Water Vapor Imagery from NOAA's Satellites of Hurricane Maria Sept. 22-25th 2017

Rewind the past 72 hours of weather from 9with this three-day composite water vapor imagery from NOAA's GOES satellites!

Of particular note in this loop are the areas of atmospheric water vapor associated with Hurricane Maria which continues to move slowly northward with large swells affecting the East Coast of the United States. For the latest information go to: www.nhc.noaa.gov.


 

Hurricane Maria's Eye

Check out this view of Hurricane Maria's eye captured by NOAA's GOES16 satellite yesterday, Sept. 21st.

On the forecast track, Maria's core will move away from the Turks and Caicos Islands today, and pass northeast and east of the Bahamas through Sunday.

This animation, which appears here courtesy of our partners at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, was created with the Advanced Baseline Imager's (ABI) Band 2 and shows how the increased resolution offered by ABI is providing meteorologists with a more detailed look at the characteristics of clouds, including those within a hurricane's eye.

To see more images of Maria and other storms, visit our image gallery @ https://goo.gl/CiuhJ1

Note: GOES-16 data are currently experimental and undergoing testing and hence should not be used operationally.

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Maria Gains a Bit of Strength

NOAA's GOES-16 satellite captured this imagery of Hurricane Maria, now moving toward the Turks and Caicos Islands on September 21, 2017. The latest advisory from NOAA's National Hurricane Center (2:00 pm EDT) says Maria is about 85 miles east-northeast of Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic, and moving toward the northwest near 9 miles per hour. A category three storm, Maria's maximum sustained winds have increased to near 120 miles per hour with higher gusts. Geocolor imagery displays geostationary satellite data in different ways depending on whether it is day or night. In daytime imagery (shown here), land and shallow-water features appear as they do in true-color imagery.

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Hurricane Maria Infrared Satellite Imagery

NOAA's GOES16 satellite captured this colorized-infrared imagery of Hurricane Maria over Puerto Rico on September 20, 2017.

This loop was created with Band-13, one of the new spectral bands offered by GOES-16's Advanced Baseline Imager. Band-13, which is primarily used to monitor clouds and storm intensity. As seen here, the dark red color, like that near the eyewall of the storm, corresponds to areas of great intensity.

Please Note: GOES-16 data are currently experimental and undergoing testing and hence should not be used operationally.

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Hurricane Maria Makes Landfall on Puerto Rico

NOAA GOES-16 Satellite captured this geocolor imagery of Hurricane Maria making landfall on Puerto Rico on the morning of September 20th. The National Hurricane Center reported (at 8:00 EDT) that Maria's maximum sustained winds were near 150 mph with higher gusts, and that hurricane-force winds extended outward up to 60 miles from the storm's center.

More images of Hurricane Maria and Jose can be found here @ https://goo.gl/CiuhJ1

Created by our partners at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, the experimental geocolor imagery enhancement displays geostationary satellite data in different ways depending on whether it is day or night. Please note that the city lights are a static background created with VIIRS Day/Night Band imagery and do not show any existing power outages.)

Please Note: GOES-16 data are currently experimental and undergoing testing and hence should not be used operationally.

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Maria Passes St. Croix as a Category 5 Storm

Maria Passes St. Croix as a Category 5 Storm

Maria Passes St. Croix as a Category 5 Storm

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the NOAA-NASA Suomi NPP satellite captured these colorized-infrared images of Hurricane #Maria at approximately 2:15 am (EDT) on September 20, 2017, as it passed close to St. Croix. At the time, Maria was a category 5 storm with winds of 165 miles per hour. "Colorized" or "color-enhanced" images like this are useful to meteorologists because they can help them identify particular features of weather systems, such as cloud-top height. In this imagery, yellow and orange areas signify taller clouds, which often correlate with greater storm intensity.

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NOAA's GOES-16 Offers Close Look at Maria's Eye

NOAA's GOES-16 captured this 1-minute visible imagery of Hurricane Maria's eye on September 19, 2017. Maria is now about 110 miles southeast of St. Croix and has maximum sustained winds of 160 miles per hour with higher gusts. Forecasters with the National Hurricane Center say the eye of Maria will move over the northeastern Caribbean Sea today, and then pass near or over the Virgin Islands overnight and Puerto Rico on Wednesday (9/20). This animation was created with the Advanced Baseline Imager's (ABI) Band 2 and shows how the increased resolution offered by ABI is providing meteorologists with a more detailed look at the characteristics and structure of severe weather.

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Maria Makes Landfall on Dominica

Maria Makes Landfall on Dominica

NOAA's GOES-16 captured this geocolor image of Hurricane Maria making landfall over Dominica on the evening of September 19. Maria is moving toward the west-northwest near 10 mph and this general motion is expected to continue through Wednesday night. The storm's maximum sustained winds are near 160 mph (260 km/h) with higher gusts.

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Maria Strengthens to Category 5 Storm

NOAA's GOES-16 captured this geocolor imagery of Hurricane #Maria, currently a Category 5 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 160 mph, on September 19, 2017. According to the National Hurricane Center the "potentially catastrophic" hurricane is headed for the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico, and then the Virgin Islands and on to Puerto Rico. Geocolor imagery appears in different ways depending on whether it is day or night. In nighttime, liquid water clouds appear in shades of blue, ice clouds are grayish-white, water looks black, and land appears gray. In daytime imagery (shown in the latter part of the loop), land and shallow-water features appear as they do in true-color imagery. (The city lights are a static background created with VIIRS Day/Night Band imagery. It does not show any existing power outages.)

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Maria Continues to Strengthen

Hurricane Maria, seen here in this 1-minute visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-16 satellite, continues to strengthen as it moves toward the Leeward Islands. At 2:00 pm EDT, September 18, 2017, NOAA's National Hurricane Center reported that Maria was about 45 miles east-northeast of Martinique and producing 125 mile-per-hour winds with higher gusts. This animation was created with the Advanced Baseline Imager's (ABI) Band 2 and shows how the increased resolution offered by ABI is providing meteorologists with a more detailed look at the characteristics and structure of severe weather. The reference to "1-minute" imagery refers to the frequency with which GOES-16's Advanced Baseline Imager captures an image of the storm.

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Maria Expected To Be a "Dangerous" Storm as it Moves over Leeward Islands

Maria Expected To Be a Dangerous Storm as it Moves over Leeward Islands

NOAA's GOES-16 satellite captured this image of Hurricane Maria approaching the Leeward Islands today, September 18, 2017. As of 11:00 am EDT, this category three storm was located about 60 miles east of Martinique and moving toward the west-northwest near 10 miles per hour. Forecasters with the National Hurricane Center say Maria, which has maximum sustained winds of near 120 miles per hour, is expected to be a "dangerous major hurricane" as it moves through the Leeward Islands and the northeastern Caribbean Sea.

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Hurricanes Jose and Maria Spin in the Atlantic

At 8:00 am EDT on September 18, 2017, the National Hurricane Center reported Jose was about 270 miles east-southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, and had maximum sustained winds of 85 miles per hour. Maria was about 85 miles east of Martinique and has maximum sustained winds of 110 mph. Geocolor imagery displays geostationary satellite data in different ways depending on whether it is day or night. This animation, captured just after daylight moved into the area, offers a blend of both.

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The Category 3 Maria Moves toward Barbados

Hurricane Maria makes its way toward Barbados in this geocolor imagery captured by NOAA's GOES-16 on the evening of September 17, 2017. as of 9/18, Maria's maximum sustained winds have increased to near 120 mph with higher gusts and rapid strengthening is forecast during the next 48 hours. Geocolor imagery displays satellite data in different ways depending on whether it is day or night. This animation, which begins during daylight hours and ends after nightfall, offers both. In daytime, land and shallow-water features appear as they do in true-color imagery. In nighttime, liquid water clouds appear in shades of blue, ice clouds are grayish-white, water looks black, and land appears gray.

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NOAA Satellite Imagery of Hurricane Irma

Sand Disturbed by the Passing of Hurricane Irma

Irma Now a Tropical Storm

Hurricane Irma didn't just impact land. As seen in these before-and-after true-color images captured by the VIIRS instrument on the NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite September 7, 2017 (top) and September 11 (bottom), the storm altered the distribution of sand around the coast of Florida. The light blue color shows sediment suspended in the water, kicked up by the intensity of the storm. According to the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, damage to natural resources in the region could be significant.

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Irma Heads toward Alabama and Georgia

NOAA's GOES-16 captured this geocolor image of Tropical Storm Irma (formerly Hurricane Irma) from landfall yesterday (9/10) to up until mid-morning today, September 11, 2017. Geocolor imagery displays geostationary satellite data in different ways depending on whether it is day or night. This imagery offers a blend of both. In nighttime, liquid water clouds appear in shades of blue, ice clouds are grayish-white, water looks black, and land appears gray. (The city lights are a static background created with VIIRS Day/Night Band imagery. It does not show any existing power outages.) In daytime, land and shallow-water features appear as they do in true-color imagery.

 


 

Irma Now a Tropical Storm

Irma Now a Tropical Storm

NOAA's GOES-16 captured this geocolor image of Tropical Storm Irma at approximately 9:00 am on September 11, 2017. At 8:00 am EDT, NOAA's National Hurricane Center reported that Irma is located about 30 miles north-northeast of Cedar Key, Florida, and has maximum sustained winds near 70 miles per hour. The center of Irma is expected to move near the northwestern coast of the Florida Peninsula today (9/11), cross the eastern Florida Panhandle into southern Georgia this afternoon, and move through southwestern Georgia and eastern Alabama tonight and Tuesday (9/12).

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Irma Now near Naples with Winds of 110 MPH

NOAA's GOES-16 captured this infrared imagery of Hurricane Irma on the afternoon of September 10, 2017. As of 5:00 pm (EDT), NOAA's National Hurricane Center reported that Irma has maximum sustained winds near 110 miles per hour with higher gusts. Although weakening is forecast, Irma is expected to remain a hurricane at least through Monday morning.

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Hurricane Irma Makes Landfall at Cudjoe Key

NOAA's GOES-16 captured this geocolor imagery of Hurricane Irma making landfall in the Florida Keys on the morning of September 10, 2017. According to the National Hurricane Center, the center of Hurricane Irma made landfall at Cudjoe Key at 9:10 am EDT.

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NOAA GOES-16 Satellite Catches Irma's Eye over the Florida Keys

NOAA GOES-16 Satellite Catches Irma's Eye over the Florida Keys

NOAA GOES-16 captured this geocolor image of #Irma's eye over the Florida Keys at approximately 9:00 am EDT this morning, September 10, 2017. According to NOAA's National Hurricane Center, Irma is a category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds near 130 miles per hour. After moving over the lower Florida Keys, the eye of Irma is expected to move near or over the west coast of the Florida Peninsula later today through tonight. Irma should then move inland over northern Florida and southwestern Georgia Monday afternoon.

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Irma in the Straits of Florida (3:40 am EDT on September 10)

NOAA GOES-16 Satellite infrared images of the Hurricane Irma in the Straits of Florida at 3:40 am EDT on September 10

NOAA GOES-16 Satellite infrared images of the Hurricane Irma in the Straits of Florida at 3:40 am EDT on September 10

These infrared images of Hurricane Irma were captured at roughly 3:40 am Eastern on 10 September 2017, about 20 minutes before the National Hurricane Center's 4 am EDT Public Advisory. The advisory from NHC reported that Hurricane Irma was a Category 4 storm and was about 55 miles SSE of Key West, FL in the Straits of Florida, with maximum sustained winds of 130 mph.

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Irma Now 115 Miles Southeast of Key West

GOES-16 captured this geocolor imagery of Hurricane Irma -- now located 115 miles southeast of Key West Florida -- on the afternoon of September 9, 2017. Currently a category 3 storm, Irma has maximum sustained winds near 125 mph with higher gusts. However, forecasters expect Irma to restrengthen once it moves away from Cuba, and remain a powerful hurricane as it approaches Florida. Geocolor imagery displays geostationary satellite data in different ways depending on whether it is day or night. This loop offers a blend of both, with nightime imagery at the beginning and daytime thereafter.

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Irma Moves along Northern Cuba, Nears Florida Keys

GOES-16 captured this geocolor imagery of Hurricane Irma along the north coast of Cuba on the morning of September 9, 2017. Forecasters with the National Hurricane Center say the core of Irma will continue to move near or over the north coast of Cuba this morning, and will reach the Florida Keys Sunday morning (9/10). The hurricane is expected to be near the southwest coast of Florida Sunday afternoon. the core of Irma will continue to move near or over the north coast of Cuba this morning, and will reach the Florida Keys Sunday morning (9/10). The hurricane is expected to be near the southwest coast of Florida Sunday afternoon.

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Irma Moves North of Cuba

GOES-16 captured this infrared imagery of Hurricane Irma, a category 4 storm, moving north of Cuba on September 8, 2017. According to forecasters with NOAA's National Hurricane Center, the eye of Irma should continue to move near the north coast of Cuba and the central Bahamas for the rest of today and Saturday (9/9), and be near the Florida Keys and the southern Florida Peninsula Sunday morning (9/10). This animation was created with the Advanced Baseline Imager's (ABI) Band 13, or longwave infrared band, and it shows how the increased resolution offered by ABI is providing meteorologists with a more detailed look at the behavior of clouds during storms.

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GOES-16 Sees Lightning in Hurricane Irma

This animation from GOES-16's Geostationary Lightning Mapper (or GLM) shows the lightning from storms associated with Hurricane Irma over an approximately 7.5 -hour period beginning at approximately 1:30 pm (EDT) and ending at about 8:00 pm on September 8, 2017. The first instrument of its kind in geostationary orbit, the lightning mapper observes total lightning (both in-cloud and cloud-to-ground) and provides a constant vigil for lightning flashes day and night across the Western Hemisphere. Rapid increases in the amount lightning are a signal that a storm is strengthening and could become more dangerous. In concert with other tools, the lightning mapper will help provide more accurate and earlier warnings of developing severe storms and give communities more time to prepare for impending severe weather.

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Irma Continues Heading West

GOES-16 watches as Hurricane Irma continues its westward advance toward the central Bahamas on September 7, 2017. This loop was created with Band-13, one of the new spectral bands offered by GOES-16's Advanced Baseline Imager. Band-13, the so-called "clean" longwave infrared band, is primarily used to monitor clouds and storm intensity. As shown here, the imagery produced by this band offers detailed views of meteorological phenomena, such as the colder cloud tops (shown in green/yellow/red), which are associated with more intense storm activity.

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GOES-16 Offers a Close Look at Irma's Eye

This 30-second visible imagery from GOES-16 offers a close-up on Hurricane Irma on September 7, 2017. This animation, which appears here courtesy of our partners at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, was created with the Advanced Baseline Imager's (ABI) Band 2, or red-visible band, and shows how the increased resolution offered by ABI is providing meteorologists with a more detailed look at the behavior of clouds during storms. The reference to "30-second" imagery refers to the frequency with which GOES-16's Advanced Baseline Imager can capture an image of the storm. 30-second imagery is produced when both of ABI's regional scan modes, each of which can produce an image every minute, are focused on the same area and then programmed to capture an image 30-seconds apart.

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Hurricane Irma Approaches Puerto Rico

GOES-16 captured this colorized-infrared imagery of Hurricane Irma approaching Puerto Rico on the afternoon of September 6, 2017. According to NOAA's National Hurricane Center, the extremely dangerous core of Irma will continue to move over portions of the Virgin Islands during the next couple of hours, pass near or just north of Puerto Rico this afternoon or tonight, pass near or just north of the coast of the Dominican Republic Thursday, and be near the Turks and Caicos and southeastern Bahamas late Thursday (9/7). This loop was created with Band-13, one of the new spectral bands offered by GOES-16's Advanced Baseline Imager. Band-13, the so-called "clean" longwave infrared band, is primarily used to monitor clouds and storm intensity.

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Irma Closes in on the Virgin Islands

GOES-16 captured this visible-infrared "sandwich" animation of Hurricane Irma, still a category 5 storm, closing in on the Virgin Islands on September 6, 2017. According to the latest information from NOAA's National Hurricane Center (issued at 11:00 am eastern), Irma was located about 65 miles east-southeast of St. Thomas (about 140 miles east of San Juan Puerto Rico) and moving toward the west-northwest near 16 miles per hour. This kind of imagery is known as a "sandwich product" because it combines imagery from two of the the 16 spectral channels offered by GOES-16's Advanced Baseline Imager: Band 2 (a visible band) and Band 13 (an infrared band). During processing, the transparency of the infrared band is increased and laid on top of the visible band. The result is imagery that offers spectacular views of storm attributes in rich detail. For example, the green, yellow, and red areas in this animation show the temperatures of cloud tops within the hurricane. The brighter colors indicate colder cloud tops, which indicate areas of greater storm intensity.

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Irma Approaches Anguilla

Satellite Photo of Irma Approaches Anguilla

GOES-16 captured this geocolor image of Hurricane Irma approaching Anguilla at about 7:15 am (eastern), September 6, 2017. Irma's maximum sustained winds remain near 185 mph with higher gusts, making it a category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. According to the latest information from NOAA's National Hurricane Center (issued at 8:00 am eastern), Irma was located about 15 miles west-southwest of Anguilla and moving toward the west-northwest near 16 miles per hour. The extremely dangerous core of Irma will move over portions of the northern Virgin Islands today, pass near or just north of Puerto Rico this afternoon or tonight, and pass near or just north of the coast of the Dominican Republic Thursday (9/7). The experimental geocolor imagery enhancement shown here displays geostationary satellite data in different ways depending on whether it is day or night. This image, captured as daylight moves into the area, offers a blend of both, with nighttime features on the left side of the image and daytime on the right.

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An Up-Close Look at Irma's Eye

This 1-minute visible imagery from GOES-16 offers a close look at Hurricane Irma's eye over an approximately 6.5-hour period beginning at about 9:00 am (eastern) to 3:30 pm, September 5, 2017. At 2:00 pm (eastern), NOAA's National Hurricane Center reported that Irma was about 180 miles east of Antigua and packing 185 mile per hour winds. This animation, which appears here courtesy of our partners at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, was created with the Advanced Baseline Imager's (ABI) Band 2, or red-visible band. The reference to "1-minute" in its name refers to the frequency with which ABI captures an image.

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Irma Approaches the Leeward Islands

Watch as Hurricane Irma moves toward the Leeward Islands in this geocolor imagery captured by GOES-16 on September 5, 2017. As of 11:00 am (eastern), NOAA's National Hurricane Center reported that Irma was about 225 miles east of Antigua and moving toward the west near 14 miles per hour. According to NHC forecasters, the "extremely dangerous" core of Irma is forecast to move over portions of the northern Leeward Islands tonight and early Wednesday (9/16). Created by our partners at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, the experimental geocolor imagery enhancement shown here displays geostationary satellite data in different ways depending on whether it is day or night. In daytime imagery (shown here), land and shallow-water features appear as they do in true-color imagery.

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Hurricane Irma Now a Category 5 Storm

GOES-16 captured this 1-minute visible imagery of the eye of Hurricane Irma, now a category 5 storm, in the Atlantic Ocean on September 5, 2017. At 8:00 am (eastern), NOAA's National Hurricane Center reported that Irma is moving toward the west near 14 miles per hour and that the storm has maximum sustained winds near 175 mph with higher gusts. This animation, which appears here courtesy of our partners at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, was created with the Advanced Baseline Imager's (ABI) Band 2, or red-visible band, and shows how the increased resolution offered by ABI is providing meteorologists with a richer, more detailed look at severe weather systems.

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Irma Begins in the Eastern Atlantic

GOES-16 captured this visible imagery of Hurricane Irma August 31, 2017. At the time, Irma was located about 650 miles west of the Cabo Verde Islands and moving toward the west-northwest near 10 miles per hour. Irma's maximum sustained winds were near 100 miles per hour with higher gusts, and the storm was forecast to become a major hurricanes. This animation was created with the Advanced Baseline Imager's (ABI) Band 2, or red-visible band, and shows how the increased resolution offered by ABI is providing meteorologists with a more detailed look at the behavior of clouds during storms.

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NOAA Satellite Imagery of Hurricane Harvey
 

GOES-16 Sees Lightning from Hurricane Harvey

GOES-16 captured this animation of Hurricane Harvey showing cloud cover and optical lightning emissions on August 25-26, 2017. This loop was created by combining infrared imagery from GOES-16's Advanced Baseline Imager, which is useful for determining the cloud features both day and night, with imagery from the satellite's Geostationary Lightning Mapper, which observes total lightning (both in-cloud and cloud-to-ground) day and night across the Western Hemisphere. Forecasters can use this kind of imagery depicting both cloud cover and lightning flashes to get a better sense of storm intensification and thunderstorm severity during dangerous weather conditions.

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Harvey's Remnants Move to the Northeast

GOES-16 captured this geocolor image of Tropical Depression Harvey at about 7:20 am CDT today, August 31, 2017. At 4:00 am CDT, NOAA's National Hurricane Center reported that Harvey would be over northwestern Mississippi by this afternoon, the western Tennessee Valley region on Friday (9/1), and into the lower Ohio Valley early Saturday (9/2). The storm is expected to dissipate by Saturday afternoon.

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Harvey Moves Farther Inland

GOES-16 captured this geocolor imagery of Tropical Storm Harvey moving farther inland this afternoon, August 30, 2017. At 1:00 pm CDT, NOAA's National Hurricane Center reported that Harvey's maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 40 mph with higher gusts. Additional weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours as the storm moves farther inland, and the cyclone is expected to weaken to a tropical depression tonight. Created by our partners at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, this daytime geocolor imagery shows land and shallow-water features similar to how they would appear in true-color imagery.

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Harvey Makes Landfall Near Cameron, LA

This GOES-16 infrared animation shows Tropical Storm Harvey making landfall just west of Cameron, Louisiana, at approximately 4:00 am CDT this morning, August 30, 2017. At 7:00 am CDT, NOAA's National Hurricane Center reported that Harvey's maximum sustained winds are near 45 mph with higher gusts. Gradual weakening is forecast as the center of the storm moves farther inland, and Harvey is expected to become a tropical depression by tonight. This loop was created with Band-13, which is primarily used to monitor clouds and storm intensity, shown here by the green, yellow and red colors of the cloud tops. In general, the brighter colors indicate more intense areas of the storm system.

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Intense Storms Continue in the Houston Area

As seen in this one-minute visible imagery captured by GOES-16 earlier today, August 29, 2017, Tropical Storm Harvey continues to deliver intense rainstorms in the Houston area. Note the rough and bubbling cloud tops to the northeast of Galveston Bay. As of 10:00 am (CDT) on August 29, 2017, NOAA's National Hurricane Center reported that Harvey is expected to be just offshore of the middle and upper coasts of Texas through tonight, then move inland over the northwestern Gulf coast early Wednesday (8/30). Harvey's maximum sustained winds remain near 45 mph with higher gusts. No significant change in strength is expected before the center moves inland. A gradual weakening should begin thereafter.

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Watch Harvey's Movements from the Evening of August 24 to Noon on August 28

This infrared imagery from GOES-16 shows the path and dissipation of Hurricane Harvey into a tropical storm during a more than 60-hour period beginning at about 8:00 pm (EDT) on August 24, 2017, and ending at noon on August 28. As of 1:00 pm CDT (on 8/28), NOAA's National Hurricane Center reported that Harvey's maximum sustained winds are near 40 mph (65 km/h) with higher gusts and forecasters say some slow intensification is possible during the next 48 hours. The storm is expected to produce additional rainfall accumulations of 15 to 25 inches through Friday over the upper Texas coast and into southwestern Louisiana.

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Rains to From Tropical Storm Harvey Continue over Texas, Louisiana

This infrared imagery from GOES-16 shows Tropical Storm Harvey earlier this morning, Monday, August 28, 2017. At 7:00 am CDT, NOAA's National Hurricane Center reported that Harvey was located about 25 miles northeast of Port O'Connor, Texas, and moving toward the southeast at approximately 3 mph. Harvey is expected to produce additional rainfall accumulations of 15 to 25 inches through Friday (9/1) over the upper Texas coast and into southwestern Louisiana. Isolated storm totals may reach 50 inches over the upper Texas coast, including the Houston/Galveston metropolitan area.

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Harvey Moves over Texas after Making Landfall

This geocolor animation from GOES-16 shows Hurricane Harvey moving over Texas last night into this morning, August 26, 2017, after making landfall. According to NOAA's National Hurricane Center, as of 9:00 am CDT Harvey was located about 85 miles southeast of San Antonio, Texas, and moving north-northwest at 6 miles per hour. Harvey's maximum sustained winds have decreased to 75 miles per hour and forecasters say Harvey is likely to become a tropical storm later today.

Note: The city lights appearing in this animation are based on a static data set and do not reflect any power outages that may have occurred.

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Hurricane Harvey Makes Landfall on the Texas Coast

GOES-16 captured this geocolor image of Hurricane Harvey making landfall on the Texas coast at approximately 10:00 pm (CDT) on August 25, 2017. Harvey's maximum sustained winds are near 130 mph, making it a category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Geocolor imagery displays geostationary satellite data in different ways depending on whether it is day or night. In nighttime imagery (shown here), liquid water clouds appear in shades of blue, ice clouds are grayish-white, water looks black, and land appears gray. The city lights are a static background created with VIIRS Day/Night Band imagery.

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Hurricane Harvey Is Now a Category 3 Storm

GOES-16 captured this geocolor imagery of Hurricane Harvey, which is now a category 3 storm, this afternoon, August 25, 2017. As of 3:00 pm (CDT), NOAA's National Hurricane Center reported that Harvey was located about 70 miles east-southeast of Corpus Christi, Texas, and its maximum sustained winds have increased to 120 miles per hour. For the latest information on expected rainfall amounts, storm surge and areas at risk of flooding, some of which could be catastrophic, visit the National Hurricane Center website.

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Harvey's Rainbands Reaching the Texas Coast

This blended visible/infrared imagery captured by GOES-16 on August 25, 2017, shows Hurricane Harvey's rainbands reaching the Texas coastline. As of 10:00 am (CDT), NOAA's National Hurricane Center reported that Harvey was approximately 115 miles southeast of Corpus Christi, Texas. Forecasters expect Harvey, which has maximum sustained winds near 110 mph with higher gusts, to make landfall on the middle Texas coast tonight or early Saturday (8/26). This loop was created by combining infrared and visible data into one animation. Doing so allows meteorologists to see a wider variety of features associated with Hurricane Harvey, such as the shadows cast by the taller cloud tops (as shown by the visible imagery) and the colder temperatures associated with the higher cloud tops (as shown by the brighter colors of the infrared imagery).

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Hurricane Harvey Is Now a Category 2 Storm

GOES-16 captured this infrared imagery of Hurricane Harvey in the Gulf of Mexico on the morning of August 25, 2017. Harvey is now a Category 2 storm and (as of 7:00 am CDT on 8/25) approximately 140 miles southeast of Corpus Christi, Texas.This animation was created with Band-13 of GOES-16's Advanced Baseline Imager and shows cloud-top temperature, which is associated with storm intensity. The brighter the color, the colder the cloud top.

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Hurricane Harvey Moves Toward the Texas Coast

Hurricane Harvey continues moves closer to the Texas coast in this GOES-16 geocolor imagery from August 24, 2017. As of 1:00 pm (CDT on 8/24), the National Hurricane Center reported that Harvey was about 335 miles southeast of Corpus Christi, Texas, and packing winds near 85 miles per hour with higher gusts. During daylight hours, the experimental geocolor enhancement displays land, atmospheric, and shallow-water features in rich detail, which gives forecasters a more defined look at severe weather systems, including cyclones.

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GOES-16 Watches Strengthening Hurricane Harvey in the Gulf

This visible imagery from GOES-16 shows the rough texture of the cloud tops in the storms associated with the strengthening Tropical Storm Harvey (now a hurricane). This rough texture is indicative of strong vertical updrafts, which are a characteristic of intense storm activity. As of 10:00 am (CDT), Harvey was located about 365 miles south-southeast of Corpus Christi, Texas, and had maximum sustained winds near 65 mph with higher gusts. For the latest information about the storm, including information regarding rainfall and storm surge, visit the National Hurricane Center website.

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Tropical Storm Harvey in the Gulf of Mexico

Image of the Tropical Storm Harvey in the Gulf of Mexico

GOES-16 captured this geocolor image of Tropical Storm Harvey in the Gulf of Mexico this morning, August 24, 2017. Geocolor imagery enhancement shown here displays geostationary satellite data in different ways depending on whether it is day or night. This image, captured as daylight moves into the area, offers a blend of both, with nighttime features on the left side of the image and daytime on the right.

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GOES-16 Spies Tropical Depression Harvey

This infrared imagery from GOES-16 shows Tropical Depression Harvey (now a hurricane) in the Gulf of Mexico on the afternoon of August 23, 2017. At this time, the storm was about 470 miles southeast of Port Mansfield, Texas, and had maximum sustain winds remain near 35 miles per hour with higher gusts. This loop was created with Band-13 of GOES-16's Advanced Baseline Imager, which offers spectacular views of meteorological phenomena such cloud top temperature. Colder cloud tops -- shown in green, yellow and red -- are associated with increased storm intensity.

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Hurricane Categories 1 through 5: Know the Difference!

Hurricane Categories 1 through 5: Know the Difference!

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Protect Your Home from Hurricane Winds

Protect Your Home from Hurricane Winds

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Storm Surge Warning Vs. Storm Surge Watch: Do You Know the Difference?

Storm Surge Warning Vs. Storm Surge Watch: Do You Know the Difference?

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2017 Total Solar Eclipse Across America 
 

GOES-16's GLM Sees the Moon's Shadow -- and Lightning!

Imagery Credit: Lockheed Martin
 

GOES-16's Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) captured the shadow of the moon moving through a area severe weather featuring frequent cloud-to-ground lightning in the upper Midwest yesterday, August 21, 2017! The first instrument of its kind in geostationary orbit, GLM observes total lightning (both in-cloud and cloud-to-ground), and offers a constant vigil for lightning flashes day and night across the Western Hemisphere.

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An EPIC View of the 2017 Solar Eclipse

Imagery Credit: NASA EPIC Team

 

From a million miles out in space, NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) on board NOAA's Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite captured this loop composed of 12 natural color images of the moon’s shadow crossing over North America on August 21, 2017. EPIC photographs the full sunlit side of Earth every day, giving it a unique view of total solar eclipses.

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VIIRS Sees the Moon's Shadow over the Midwest

Suomi NPP View of the 2017 Solar Eclipse

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite captured this color-enhanced infrared image of the moon's shadow during today's solar eclipse. In this so-called "natural color" RGB composite image, vegetation appears green, liquid clouds appear white, and higher ice clouds appear as cyan. Note, however, how nothing appears in the area covered by the moon's shadow.

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Follow the Moon's Shadow across the Northern Hemisphere

Follow the shadow of the moon as it moves West to East across the Northern Hemisphere in this geocolor animation from NOAA's GOES-16 satellite!

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Watch the Moon's Shadow Move from Coast to Coast

Watch the moon's shadow move from coast to coast in this latest geocolor animation from GOES-16! The loop begins at 12:27 pm (eastern) and ends at 2:52 pm today. This animation comes to us courtesy of GOES-16's Advanced Baseline Imager, which can capture an image of the continental United States every 5 minutes!

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The Moon's Shadow Moves East of the Mississippi

The Moon's Shadow Moves East of the Mississippi

Continuing on its way toward the Atlantic, the center of the moon's shadow is now east of the Mississippi River! This image comes to us courtesy of GOES-16's Advanced Baseline Imager, which can take a full-disk image of the Earth like this one every 15 minutes!

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The Full-Disk Geocolor Image from GOES-16!

The Full-Disk Geocolor Image from GOES-16!

This full-disk geocolor image from GOES-16 shows the shadow of the move covering a large portion of the northwestern U.S. earlier today, August 21, 2017.

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The Shadow's March Continues!

As seen in this geocolor animation from NOAA's GOES-16 satellite, the shadow of the moon has moved further inland from the Pacific and now covers a large portion of the northwestern U.S.

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Moon's Shadow Makes Landfall over the Pacific Northwest

Moon's Shadow Makes Landfall over the Pacific Northwest

The shadow the moon blots out the Pacific Northwest in this GOES-16 geocolor image of the 2017 Solar Eclipse.

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The Moon's Shadow Darkens the West Coast

Watch as the moon's shadow begins to darken the West Coast in this first GOES-16 geocolor animation of #Eclipse2017!

While most of America will be looking up to catch a glimpse of today's solar eclipse, NOAA's GOES-16 satellite will be looking down from its orbit 23,000 miles above the Earth, tracking the moon’s shadow across the United States.

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Here it comes!

The moon's shadow approaches the West Coast of the United Stated in this GOES-16 geocolor animation from earlier today, August 21, 2017.

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NOAA's GOES-16 satellite will have a clear view of the moon’s shadow as it travels diagonally across the United States, from the Pacific Northwest through South Carolina. We'll be sharing a variety of GOES-16 images and animations throughout the day, including:
 
  • The beginning of the eclipse on the West Coast
  • The path of the eclipse across the entire U.S.
  • The moon’s shadow as it passes beyond the U.S.
 
We'll also have images from the EPIC camera on board NOAA’s DSCOVR satellite. Sitting one million miles from Earth, between our planet and the sun, DSCOVR will offer its own unique perspective on the eclipse!
 
So don’t worry if you're far from the eclipse path or it’s cloudy outside—we've reserved a spot for you right here!
 
Still want to see it in person? Find a great spot using our historical cloudiness map to determine your best chance of a clear view of this historic event -- and don’t forget to check your local weather forecast!

 

GOES-16 Gallery

A Note to the Weather Community about Using GOES-16 Data:

"NOAA's GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing. Users assume all risk related to their use of GOES-16 data and NOAA disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. "