Countdown to DSCOVR!

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    It's a Joint Effort
    NOAA, NASA, and U.S. Air Force have come together in a joint effort to launch the DSCOVR satellite. After many years in storage, the DSCOVR satellite, formerly “Triana,” was deemed the best solution for NOAA to continue solar wind observations. NASA is refurbishing the satellite and its instruments, and the U.S. Air Force is overseeing the launch of DSCOVR, which will be aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.

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    Positioned to Monitor and Alert
    The DSCOVR satellite will be stationed at the L1 orbit, located one million miles away from Earth. At this location, the satellite will be in the best position to monitor the constant stream of particles from the sun, known as solar wind, and provide warnings of approaching geomagnetic storms caused by solar wind about an hour before they reach Earth. This early warning will significantly help with preparedness.

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    Forecasting Geomagnetic Storms
    The DSCOVR mission will support the NWS Space Weather Prediction Center to provide advanced warning forecasts of approaching geomagnetic storms. These early warnings will help prevent disruption to virtually every major public infrastructure system, including transportation systems, power grids, telecommunications and GPS. A National Research Council Report estimates recovering from the most extreme storms could cost $1 to $2 trillion and take up to a decade.

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    Follow the Countdown to Launch!
    As the agency responsible for operational space weather forecasts and warnings, NOAA is the lead for DSCOVR data. NOAA and its partners are working to keep DSCOVR on schedule for a January 2015 launch in order to continue the critical observations of solar wind. Keep watch and learn more about solar wind, the DSCOVR satellite, and the upcoming launch by visiting the new DSCOVR webpage:http://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/DSCOVR

The countdown is on for the launch of the Deep Space Climate Observatory, or DSCOVR. This mission will monitor the Earth’s space environment and provide advance warning of harmful solar activity, like solar wind, that could affect Earth. Quality warnings of these space weather events are essential for protecting critical infrastructure like communications and power systems from potential damage. The satellite launch is on track for January 2015.

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NESDIS Global Data
This data portal provides access to global maps representing a variety of observations from satellites, ground stations and historical collections. In the dropdown menu are four sample datasets out of the many you can access on the full version of NOAA View. After choosing your dataset, scroll back to see how that dataset has changed over time.
NOAA View Website (full-version) » Video Tour (full version)