• Science on A Sphere at NOAA/NESDIS

    Science on a Sphere is an immersive environment for learning about earth, the environment and weather. In 2013, a Science on a Sphere installation will come to NESDIS and local students and adults will benefit from the amazing simulation of the earth's weather patterns. More »

  • GOES-R ABI Game-Spectrix

    Create the perfect combinations of colors to produce vital information about weather and the environment. Play now! »

  • How do these strong winds form? It all has to do with something called a downburst. Learn More »

  • Play Satellite Insight, the new, fun, free iPhone game. You will have to think and move fast to keep up with the massive flow of different types of data being captured by GOES-R. More »

  • Looking Up at the Sky with NOAA and Hurricanes are two NESDIS K-12 educational aides that make learning about the sky and earth fun! Updated regularly. Download a hi-res pdf(1.5mb) Looking at the Sky with NOAA » | Hurricanes »

  • NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) provides educators access to reliable scientific information through an array of professional development opportunities. Participants learn how to use data resources, digital tools, and other innovative technologies.

NESDIS Education

NOAA's Satellites and Information Service manages data relating to the Earth and solar environments. The links on this page are resources within NESDIS and NOAA which we believe may be of interest to students, educators, and anyone interested in learning more about our Earth-Sun environment. We welcome your input to our programs and invite comments, suggestions, and partners for development of new material.

Contact Nina Jackson at: nina.jackson@noaa.gov

Also visit: NOAA Education Outreach

Global Data: Understanding Our World as it Changes

world map flat

Week

Vegetation Health

Vegetation Health
Though most of the Earth is covered by water, 25 percent of the planet’s surface is a dynamic green. NOAA scientists use satellite observations of vegetation greenness to develop vegetation health products that can be used as proxy data for monitoring drought, soil saturation, moisture and thermal conditions, fire risk, greenness of vegetation cover, vegetation fraction, leaf area index, start and end of the growing season, crop and pasture productivity, El Niño-Southern Oscillation climate anomalies, desertification, mosquito-borne diseases, invasive species, ecological resources, land degradation and more.
Use the slider to follow a weekly “greenup” for 2007. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock or urban areas.

Source: http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/smcd/emb/vci/VH/vh_browse.php
Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR)

Ocean Depth

Using satellites, ships and remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) collects data and studies the underwater depth and "beds" or "floors" of bodies of water (known as bathymetry data). The topography of the ocean floor is difficult to measure itself, but the ocean surface, which can easily be measured, mimics the bumps and dips found on the ocean floor. From the data taken by satellites, the NGDC is able to develop high resolution models of the ocean floor.
Use the slider to drain layers of water from Earth’s oceans, 500m at a time, revealing the topography of the ocean floor. The longer a region stays blue, the deeper that point is on the ocean floor.

Source: http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/bathymetry/relief.html
National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC)

Ice Cover
Satellite imaging is able to collect information that data centers then use to plot fluctuations of sea ice. During the warmest winters recorded, like winter 2005-2006, the maximum cover of ice over Arctic waters (referred to as “sea ice extent”) is less than in colder years. The minimum cover of ice over Arctic waters occurs in the summer. In summer 2012, this minimum was the lowest measure of sea ice extent since satellite observations of polar ice have been recorded.
Use the slider to track the weekly sea ice cover over the course of a year.

Source: http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/smcd/emb/snow/HTML/snow.htm
Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR)

Climatologies
Climate models use quantitative methods to simulate the interactions of the atmosphere, oceans, land surface and ice. They are used for a variety of purposes from the study of weather and climate system dynamics to projections of future climate. Because of the slow rate at which water heats and cools, sea surface temperature is one example of climatological data crucial to understanding climate change. Use the slider to track the daily observation of sea surface temperature for 2010-2011. The black areas that appear are missing data points due to cloud cover.

Source: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/SatelliteData/pathfinder4km/available.html
National Oceanographicl Data Center (NODC)

Vegetation Health
Though most of the Earth is covered by water, 25 percent of the planet’s surface is a dynamic green. NOAA scientists use satellite observations of vegetation greenness to develop vegetation health products that can be used as proxy data for monitoring drought, soil saturation, moisture and thermal conditions, fire risk, greenness of vegetation cover, vegetation fraction, leaf area index, start and end of the growing season, crop and pasture productivity, El Niño-Southern Oscillation climate anomalies, desertification, mosquito-borne diseases, invasive species, ecological resources, land degradation and more.
Use the slider to follow a weekly “greenup” for 2007. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock or urban areas.
Source: http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/smcd/emb/vci/VH/vh_browse.php
Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR)

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