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Real-Time Imagery

NOAA operates a fleet of environmental satellites that maintain a watchful eye on the Earth. Hover and click on the satellite missions below to load real-time imagery and learn more about our missions and how they serve the public.
More details on missions and products »

POES

Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite

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GOES

Geostationary Orbiting Environmental Satellite

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DMSP

Defense Meteorological Satellite Program

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Jason-2

Jason-2

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Suomi NPP

National Polar-orbiting Partnership

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GOES-R

Geostationary Orbiting Environmental Satellite - R Series

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POES

  • POES Daily Image
    POES Daily Image
  • Orbits at approximately 833 kilometers above the Earth, over the North and South poles providing global coverage every 6 hours
  • Data from POES series supports environmental monitoring applications including weather analysis and forecasting, climate research and prediction, sea surface temperature, atmospheric soundings of temperature and humidity, ocean dynamics research, volcanic eruption monitoring, forest fire detection, global vegetation analysis, and search and rescue,
  • This images shows Sea Surface Temperature (SST)-the water temperature close to the ocean's surface
  • POES Website
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GOES-O

DMSP

  • DMSP Daily Image
    DMSP Daily Image
  • Providing global coverage twice per day
  • Data captured from DMSP sensors contributes to the generation of this daily global map of snow and ice cover
  • Along with data from other satellites and sources, scientists use snow and ice cover observations study climate change and sea level-rise
  • DMSP Website

JASON

  • Jason-2 Daily Image
    Jason-2 Daily Image
  • Jason-2 is the latest in a series of ocean altimeter missions designed to observe ocean circulation, sea level rise, and wave heights.
  • This image is part ofa new suiteof data products produced by NOAA to predict where hurricanes are likely to form, strengthen, or weaken.
  • Pink = surface water at 26 degrees Celsius or warmer
    Purple = deep layers of warm water.
  • It was these deep reserves of warm Gulf of Mexico water that allowed for the development of Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma in quick succession.
  • Jason-2 Website
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Suomi NPP

  • Suomi NPP Image
    Suomi NPP Image
  • Suomi NPP is the preporatory mission for the JPSS
  • The satellite orbit the earth approximately every 100 minutes, and covers each location twice a day
  • Enhanced capabilities of S-NPP allow it to gather more information and in higher resolution than its predecessor the NOAA POES satellites.The ability to see Earth in true color is a prime example of these advancements. NPP is the precursor to JPSS, NOAA NASA Joint Polar Satellite System
  • JPSS Website

GOES-R

  • GOES-R Real-Time Simulation
    GOES-R Real-Time Simulation
  • GOES-R Series satellites are the next generation of geostationary weather satellites. Launch Readiness Date:October 2015
  • GOES-R Series will greatly improve detection/observation of meteorological phenomena that directly impact public safety, protection of property, and economic health and development.
  • GOES-R will advance observation of the Earth's ocean and atmosphere and improve space weather monitoring.
  • This image is a real-time simulation of how GOES-R will measure atmospheric water vapor over the United States
  • Orange = dry air, Blue-white = moist air
  • http://www.goes-r.gov

Global Data: Understanding Our World as it Changes

world map flat

Week

Vegetation Health

Vegetation Health
Though most of the Earth is covered by water, 25 percent of the planet’s surface is a dynamic green. NOAA scientists use satellite observations of vegetation greenness to develop vegetation health products that can be used as proxy data for monitoring drought, soil saturation, moisture and thermal conditions, fire risk, greenness of vegetation cover, vegetation fraction, leaf area index, start and end of the growing season, crop and pasture productivity, El Niño-Southern Oscillation climate anomalies, desertification, mosquito-borne diseases, invasive species, ecological resources, land degradation and more.
Use the slider to follow a weekly “greenup” for 2007. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock or urban areas.

Source: http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/smcd/emb/vci/VH/vh_browse.php
Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR)

Ocean Depth

Using satellites, ships and remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) collects data and studies the underwater depth and "beds" or "floors" of bodies of water (known as bathymetry data). The topography of the ocean floor is difficult to measure itself, but the ocean surface, which can easily be measured, mimics the bumps and dips found on the ocean floor. From the data taken by satellites, the NGDC is able to develop high resolution models of the ocean floor.
Use the slider to drain layers of water from Earth’s oceans, 500m at a time, revealing the topography of the ocean floor. The longer a region stays blue, the deeper that point is on the ocean floor.

Source: http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/bathymetry/relief.html
National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC)

Ice Cover
Satellite imaging is able to collect information that data centers then use to plot fluctuations of sea ice. During the warmest winters recorded, like winter 2005-2006, the maximum cover of ice over Arctic waters (referred to as “sea ice extent”) is less than in colder years. The minimum cover of ice over Arctic waters occurs in the summer. In summer 2012, this minimum was the lowest measure of sea ice extent since satellite observations of polar ice have been recorded.
Use the slider to track the weekly sea ice cover over the course of a year.

Source: http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/smcd/emb/snow/HTML/snow.htm
Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR)

Climatologies
Climate models use quantitative methods to simulate the interactions of the atmosphere, oceans, land surface and ice. They are used for a variety of purposes from the study of weather and climate system dynamics to projections of future climate. Because of the slow rate at which water heats and cools, sea surface temperature is one example of climatological data crucial to understanding climate change. Use the slider to track the daily observation of sea surface temperature for 2010-2011. The black areas that appear are missing data points due to cloud cover.

Source: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/SatelliteData/pathfinder4km/available.html
National Oceanographicl Data Center (NODC)

Vegetation Health
Though most of the Earth is covered by water, 25 percent of the planet’s surface is a dynamic green. NOAA scientists use satellite observations of vegetation greenness to develop vegetation health products that can be used as proxy data for monitoring drought, soil saturation, moisture and thermal conditions, fire risk, greenness of vegetation cover, vegetation fraction, leaf area index, start and end of the growing season, crop and pasture productivity, El Niño-Southern Oscillation climate anomalies, desertification, mosquito-borne diseases, invasive species, ecological resources, land degradation and more.
Use the slider to follow a weekly “greenup” for 2007. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock or urban areas.
Source: http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/smcd/emb/vci/VH/vh_browse.php
Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR)

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