NOAA -- The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS)

News & Articles Archive

Tiros-1 cover
On April 1, 1960, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) launched the Television Infra-Red Observation Satellite (TIROS-1), the world’s first successful weather satellite. 
Suomi NPP image of swollen river in Alaska
As part of the River Ice and Flooding Initiative, NOAA scientists with the Joint Polar Satellite System are working with experts in academia through the JPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction (PGGR) Program to help communities identify the risk of ice jams and prepare for these hazards. 
GOES-15 hurricane image
March 4, 2016, was the 6th anniversary of the launch of GOES-P (now GOES-15), one of NOAA’s Eyes in the Sky for the Western Hemisphere. p { width:900px; }
GOES water vapor image of storm over western Gulf of Mexico
It’s no secret that NOAA satellites play a vital role in generating weather forecasts, but did you know that they’re just as important to the development of the USDA’s agricultural  forecasts?
GOES-R InfoG
The GOES-R satellite is set to launch on November 4, 2016. GOES-R, or GOES-16 as it will be known once operational, will launch on board an Atlas V 541 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.
diagram of the data sources in Crop Explorer
In “NOAA Satellite Data Aids the Nation's Agricultural Forecasts,” we highlighted the Joint Agricultural Weather Facility and its publication, Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin, which offers detailed descriptions of satellite imagery and blended data products to help agricultural producers respond to changing weather conditions. In this article, we're taking a look at another USDA information product that relies on satellite data—Crop Explorer.
GOES-R Night
The GOES-R team has begun a series of important rehearsals to ensure its personnel are prepared for every facet of the satellite's upcoming launch.
green earth
A new study based long-term vegetation data sets derived, in part, from NOAA polar-orbiting satellites has found significant greening on a quarter to one-half of the Earth's vegetated lands. 
JPSS
Once operational, JPSS-1 will circle the Earth from pole-to-pole and cross the equator 14 times a day in its afternoon orbit—providing full global coverage twice a day.