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NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS)

News & Articles Archive

Image of the drawing commissioned by Wexler
Dr. Harry Wexler, director of meteorological research for the U.S. Weather Bureau, was a strong proponent of the idea that satellites would be of “great value,” for both warning people about approaching severe weather and gathering information about the atmosphere. Yet, despite his advocacy,  Wexler knew he needed to do more than tell his colleagues about the scientific advantages of satellites, he had to show them. In 1954, he did just that.
artist's rendition of space weather
Working in concert, the four space-weather instruments aboard GOES-16’s will enable NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center to significantly improve space weather forecasts, provide early warning of possible impacts to Earth’s space environment, and potentially disruptive events on the ground.
GOES-16 full disk image showing lightning flashes
First of its kind instrument in geostationary orbit will help forecasters pinpoint severe storms sooner
Graphic of hydrobundle climate data record
NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information has released a new “hydrobundle” Climate Data Record (CDR) to provide a clearer, broader picture of the hydrological aspects of Earth’s climate.
A photo of different parts of the SEISS instrument Magnetospheric Particle Sensor-Low Energy Range (MPS-LO), Magnetospheric Particle Sensor-High Energy Range (MPS-HI), Solar and Galactic Proton Sensor X-Harness(SGPS +X), Solar and Galactic Proton Sensor Y-Harness(SGPS+Y), Data Processing Unit (DPU) and Energetic Heavy Ion Sensor (EHIS).
The latest advanced instrument that will fly on NOAA’s next-generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R (GOES-R) spacecraft is completed and cleared for installation onto the satellite. 
Four of the six instruments that will fly on the first Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) were delivered to Lockheed Martin
Four of the six instruments that will fly on the first Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) were delivered to Lockheed Martin in Denver for integration onto the spacecraft bus this month. This marks the beginning of a new phase in the development of the GOES-R satellite scheduled for launch in 2016.  p { width:900px; }
The EXIS and SUVI instruments are installed onto the sun pointing platform of the GOES-R spacecraft.
Two of the six instruments that will fly on the first Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R (GOES-R) satellite have completed integration with the spacecraft. The Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) and Extreme Ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensors (EXIS) were installed on the sun-pointing platform. 
Magnetometer
The Magnetometer instrument that will fly on NOAA's GOES-R satellite when it is launched in 2016 has completed the development and testing phase and is ready to be integrated with the spacecraft. 
These images show the progress of the spacecraft mate as it was underway at the Lockheed Martin facility near Denver. With the core spacecraft now complete, instrument installation will begin. Credit: Lockheed Martin
System module and core module are joined to create the GOES-R spacecraft structure.