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NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS)

News & Articles Archive

GOES-17
This week, top officials from NOAA shared new updates on efforts to resolve the technical issues impacting the performance of the GOES-17 Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), predicting all of the ABI spectral channels will be available for the majority of the day. 
A large meteor seen in Southern Australia, April 24, 2011
What do lightning strikes and meteoroids zipping through space have in common? It turns out they both can be tracked from a weather satellite. Scientists have discovered that the Geostationary Lightning Mapper on NOAA’s GOES-16 and GOES-17 satellites sees more than just lightning flashes in our skies.
This GOES East GLM imagery shows a high concentration of lightning flashes over the Northern Plains on June 11, 2018. (Image Credit: NOAA Virtual Lab)
Lightning strikes, giant sparks of electricity in Earth’s atmosphere that are hotter than the surface of the sun, are a major hazard during thunderstorms. Knowing when and where lightning is occurring can tell us a lot about a storm - including its location, whether it’s intensifying, and if the storm is capable of producing severe weather. 
NOAA ECMOU Signing
NOAA and Environment Canada (EC) recently signed an agreement which provides for mutual assistance and sharing of satellite imagery in case of a large oil spill in U.S. or Canadian waters. Under the agreement, NOAA would draw on EC's experience in responding to oil spills in ice-infested waters and using specialized radar satellites, while EC would benefit from NOAA's expertise in monitoring oil thickness and using other imagery tools.  Also, the agencies will exchange new techniques to get more and better information to first responders.
The Ocean Surface Topography Mission: Past, Present and Future
Jason-2, the international oceanography satellite that has helped us map the ocean floor and measure global sea level rise, marks its tenth year in orbit today. The satellite has completed just over 47,000 trips around the Earth since it was launched into space on June 20, 2008. 
October 2017 sea surface temperature anomaly in the North Atlantic
Satellites are a valuable tool for monitoring Earth’s oceans, which cover more than 70 percent of our planet. This visualization shows 2017 sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean using data from NOAA’s satellites. 
GOES-17 SUVI view of the sun in six extreme ultraviolet wavelengths during a solar flare on May 28, 2018. Credit: NOAA/NASA
The GOES-17 Solar Ultraviolet Imager, or SUVI, began taking observations on May 16, 2018. It joins a sister instrument on GOES-16, imaging the sun in the extreme ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. 
Slow Storm - What Happens when Hurricanes Get Stuck
NOAA Scientist Kossin releases paper on global slowdown of tropical cyclones. What happens when a hurricane gets stuck? Was Harvey just the beginning?
The "Turn The Tide on Plastic" race boat
In celebration of NOAA Oceans Month, NOAA is highlighting the value of data collected from the world’s oceans. This year NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) have collaborated with research scientists at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel, Germany to archive ocean data collected during the Volvo Ocean Race. The new data will help researchers learn more about the health of our oceans, including the prevalence of microplastic particle pollution.