NOAA -- The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS)

News & Articles Archive

An artist's rendering of the ATS-1 spacecraft
Fifty years ago, at 9:12 p.m. Eastern on December 6, 1966, a NASA Atlas rocket carried the Applications Technology Satellite (ATS-1) to space, becoming the first Earth-observing satellite ever placed in geostationary orbit.
Map showing the areas of coverage from GOES-16 satellites
Now that GOES-R, the first in NOAA’s GOES-R series of satellites, has reached geostationary orbit, it has officially become GOES-16.
Map of global surface type
Scientists with the Joint Polar Satellite Systems program at NOAA’s Center for Satellite Applications and Research have announced the release of the 2016 update to the VIIRS Global Surface Type (GST) data.
International Space Station Time Lapse
Yes, you can see satellites from Earth, but it isn't easy.
Suomi and Parent
2015, marks the centennial of the birth of Dr. Verner Suomi, the Finnish-American educator, inventor, and scientist known as the “Father of Satellite Meteorology.”  
image from the launch of GOES-16
GOES-R, the first of NOAA’s highly advanced geostationary weather satellites, has successfully lifted off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, and is on its way to orbit!
diagram of atlas V541 rocket
“T- 3..2..1..Liftoff!” As we head toward launch, all eyes and ears will be on NOAA’s GOES-R satellite atop its Atlas V 541 rocket. Make sure you are caught up on launch day lingo so that you can follow along! 
NOAA’s GOES-R satellite, America’s next-generation geostationary weather satellite, will lift off from Kennedy Space Center at approximately 5:42pm EST on November 19, 2016.
“T- 3..2..1..Liftoff!” As we head toward launch, all eyes and ears will be on NOAA’s GOES-R satellite atop its Atlas V 541 rocket. Make sure you are caught up on launch day lingo so that you can follow along! 
map showing location of sea prism in western lake erie
Last summer, Lake Erie became the first site in the Great Lakes—and the first site in U.S. inland waters—to participate in an international effort that provides data on ocean radiance for use in scientific research and validating satellite-derived measurements of ocean color.