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Hurricane Dorian 2019

September 6, 2019

Hurricane Dorian made landfall over Cape Hatteras, N.C., at 8:35 a.m. EDT Friday, Sept. 6, 2019, with maximum sustained winds near 90 mph. NOAA’s GOES East captured this view of the strong Category 1 storm at 8:20 a.m. EDT, just 15 minutes before the center of the storm moved across the barrier islands.

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September 5, 2019

The center of Hurricane Dorian, seen here by NOAA's GOES East, moved close to the South Carolina coast on Sept. 5, 2019. The Category 3 storm produced very heavy rainfall along the North and South Carolina coasts, according to the National Hurricane Center.

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September 4, 2019

Hurricane Dorian is seen spinning less than 100 miles east-northeast of Daytona Beach, Florida, in this Sept. 4, 2019, loop from NOAA’s GOES East satellite.

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The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) aboard NOAA's GOES East captured this view of Hurricane Dorian overnight on Sept. 4, 2019. The GLM continually looks for lightning flashes in the Western Hemisphere, both on land and nearby ocean regions and can detect all three major lightning types: in-cloud, cloud-to-cloud and cloud-to-ground lightning. Alongside radar and other weather satellite data, lightning information helps forecasters understand when a storm is forming, intensifying and becoming more dangerous.

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September 3, 2019

Watch this GOES East timelapse of Dorian from Aug. 29, 2019 — just a day after the tropical system became a hurricane — until Sept. 3, 2019, when the dangerous storm began to pull away from the Bahamas and headed for the U.S. mainland.

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While Hurricane Dorian lashed the Bahamas throughout Labor Day weekend, two other storms were brewing — one in the Atlantic, and another in the Eastern Pacific. In this GOES West view, captured at 1:20 p.m. EDT on Sept. 3, 2019, you can see all three storms: Hurricane Juliette, Tropical Storm Fernand, and Hurricane Dorian.

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As the polar-orbiting Suomi NPP satellite passed over Hurricane Dorian early on Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019, it captured this imagery of the storm's southern eyewall pounding Grand Bahama Island. The eye of Dorian slowly pushed away from the battered island as the day progressed, setting its sights on the U.S. mainland, where hurricane warnings were in effect from Jupiter Inlet to Ponte Vedra Beach in Florida, as well as from north of Edisto Beach to South Santee River in South Carolina.

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September 2, 2019

This nearly 5-hour loop from GOES East shows Hurricane Dorian inching across Grand Bahama Island on Sept. 2, 2019

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Catastrophic Hurricane Dorian slowed to a crawl over Grand Bahama Island overnight Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, and into Labor Day. On Monday, Sept. 2, 2019, GOES East captured a view of the Category 5 storm over Grand Bahama where it unleashed destructive hurricane-force winds, along with 200 mph gusts.

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September 1, 2019

GOES East spotted lightning in the eye of Hurricane Dorian on the morning of Sept. 1, 2019. The catastrophic Category 5 storm brought life-threatening storm surge and very heavy rainfall to the Abaco and Grand Bahama islands.

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The very symmetrical eye of powerful Category 5 Hurricane Dorian was tracked by NOAA’s GOES East satellite on Sept. 1, 2019. In this visible loop, the center of Dorian is approaching Great Abaco Island in the northern Bahamas. From this vantage point, you can see the eye’s “stadium effect”, which is fairly common in strong hurricanes. The stadium effect refers to how the clouds curve outward from the eye as you travel higher into the atmosphere, which makes the eye’s structure resemble the layout of a sports stadium.

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August 31, 2019

NOAA’s next-generation polar satellite, NOAA-20, tapped into its Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument to snap this image of Hurricane Dorian from more than 500 miles up on Aug. 31, 2019. VIIRS allows observations of Earth's atmosphere and surface at night and offers enhanced capability to see through clouds. It also provides unique data for finding the center of tropical cyclones during nighttime hours.

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August 30, 2019

Hurricane Dorian rapidly intensified on Aug. 30, 2019, strengthening to an extremely dangerous Category 3 storm by the afternoon.

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The eye of Hurricane Dorian can be seen forming in this one-minute visible loop captured by NOAA's GOES East satellite on Aug. 30, 2019. The formation of an eye is almost always an indicator of increasing tropical cyclone organization and strength. When this imagery was taken, the National Hurricane Center said the storm posed a “significant threat to Florida and the northwestern Bahamas.”

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The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) aboard NOAA's GOES East captured this view of all the lightning associated with Hurricane Dorian in the morning hours of Aug. 30, 2019. The GLM continually looks for lightning flashes in the Western Hemisphere, both on land and nearby ocean regions and can detect all three major lightning types: in-cloud, cloud-to-cloud and cloud-to-ground lightning. Alongside radar and other weather satellite data, lightning information helps forecasters understand when a storm is forming, intensifying and becoming more dangerous.

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August 29, 2019

NOAA’s GOES East satellite zoomed in on Hurricane Dorian on Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, as the Category 1 storm continued churning across the open waters of the Atlantic, moving away from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Low wind shear and very warm waters aided the rapid intensification of this storm.

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August 28, 2019

Dorian became a hurricane on Aug. 28, 2019, when its sustained winds hit 74 mph. During this time, NOAA’s GOES East satellite was watching as Dorian moved through the Virgin Islands. With its center of circulation passing just to the east of Puerto Rico, Dorian’s worst winds and waves stayed away from the island but battered St. Thomas, St. John and St. Croix, VI.

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August 27, 2019

This impressive image should be called, “The Picture of Dorian with Dust.” Looking down from NOAA’s GOES East, a then-Tropical Storm Dorian is seen passing through the Lesser Antilles on Aug. 27, 2019. Well off to the northeast of Dorian, the satellite also picked up one of the largest Saharan dust plumes of the season being blown off North Africa. Saharan dust can inhibit Atlantic hurricane and tropical storm development by bringing warm, dry and stable air into the tropical systems.

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